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1975 Southerner 






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48 



Nixon's Resignation 

A Few Wrong Judgements 



by Buddy Mayo 



Although the events of Summer 1974 did 
not occur during the months this yearbook 
traditionally covers, they were events that will 
have incalculable affects on our nation's his- 
tory. The resignation of Richard M. Nixon, 
37th President of the United States, marked 
the first time in the life of our country that a 
President, because of severed political ties 
and widespread public mistrust, was forced 
to resign from office. 

A Supreme Court ruling marked the begin- 
ning of the termination of Nixon's presi- 
dency. In the case United States v. Richard 
M. Nixon, President of the United States, et 
al the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that 
Nixon and his band of court-weary col- 
leagues would have to hand over to Federal 




District Judge John J. Sirica all tapes and other 
records of 64 White House conversations. 

But Nixon's resignation came only after im- 
peachment became definite. The 38-member 
House Judiciary Committee passed three of 
five articles of impeachment and full House 
recommendation for impeachment seemed 
overwhelmingly certain. Even Nixon's hope 
of Senate acquittal vanished after public dis- 
closure of a June 23, 1972 conversation be- 
tween the President and then White House 
Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman. It was during 
this conversation that the initial conception 
of a White House cover-up was planned. 

On August 8, 1974, at 9 p.m. EST, Richard 
Nixon announced to the nation over televi- 
sion that he planned to resign. The an- 
nouncement came 16 days after the Supreme 
Court handed down its ruling, 11 days after 
the House Judiciary Committee finished its 
hearings and three days after public dis- 
closure of the June 23 tape. Ten hours before 
the announcement, Nixon, the 37th President 
of the United States, met with Vice President 



Gerald R. Ford receives congratulations from Chief 
lustice Warren Burger who has just sworn him in as 
the 38th President of the United States. Ford, who 
was nominated Vice President after Spiro Agnew 
resigned, is the first President to serve without first 
having to participate in a national campaign. 



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Gerald R. Ford and informed him that he 
would soon become the 38th. 

On August 9, 1974 Richard M. Nixon left 
Washington and the presidency— 896 days 
before the end of his term. This also was the 
day the Committee to Re-elect the President 
finally settled the lawsuit brought by the 
Democratic National Committee for the Wa- 
tergate break-in by paying the DNC and 
other plaintiffs $775,000 in damages. On this 
day, too, Mme. Tussaud's Wax Museum in 
London removed Richard Nixon's likeness 
from display and put it in storage. 

So after more than two years, Nixon's pub- 
lic stonewalling was over. In his resignation 
announcement Nixon found himself guilty of 
only a few "wrong judgements" and a victim 
of political betrayal. He denied the millions 
of television viewers any sign of humiliation 
and any sign that he was sorry for betraying 
their trust in him. 

His public stonewalling was over. All that 
lay ahead was his own mental stonewalling of 
the events that forced him out of office— his 
own guilt, his own failures. 

Life's magazine, "The Year in Pictures" said 
of Nixon's farewell, ". . . And then he flung 
his arms in the air in that strange marionette 
way and smiled a tearful welcome to 
calamity." 

By the time the 1975 schoolyear had begun 
the tragic events of a month earlier had been 
buried. The nation was in the hands of a new 
President— a new President with the added 
responsibility of re-establishing trust and 
honesty in his office. 



Richard Nixon during his resignation announce 
merit over national television. 




News Wrap-up 



Fall Quarter 



by Waid Prather 



With the abortion of registration out of the 
way the new and returning Southern students 
set about enjoying campus life, something 
they found to be somewhat harder to do 
than in years before. 

To begin, the parking problems of year 
past were not only still with us but were mul- 
tiplied with the sudden increase in construc- 
tion. Construction of stadium additions 
(more puzzling to many students as the foot- 
ball season progressed), the new Student 
Union and, yes, even a new parking lot made 
car ownership as much a problem as a boon. 

In addition to obliterated parking spaces, 
trees all over campus fell victim to bulldozers 
and chain saws raising still more controversey 
over the additions. 

Other initial disappointments included the 
Keyhole, which proved to be a bewildering 
table of numbers rather than a handy guide 
to teacher selection, and Harry Chapin, who 
canceled out the UAC's first concert efforts. 

If conditions on campus were off to a poor 



start, conditions off campus were and contin- 
ued to be abominable throughout the 
quarter. 

On the national scene Ford was attempting 
to close the book on Watergate by pre- 
maturely pardoning Nixon; unfortunately, he 
closed the book on his own finger and the 
pain lingered on. Ford's amnesty plan met 
with resistance from both sides within the 
country and only token reaction from outside 
as only a few draft resisters replied to his 
offer. 

If his own ineptness was not enough by the 
end of our quarter Ford was catching flack 
for the thick tongues of his associates as Earl 
Butz and General George S. Brown mixed 
things up with Catholics and Jews. 

Meanwhile, America was showing its lib- 
eral attitudes on television with such shows 
as "Chico and the Man," while in Boston 
deep rooted prejudice and in West Virginia 
shallow minded fear reared their ugly heads 
to violent reality. 



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On the political scene Ted Kennedy 
created a Democratic free-for-all; Rockefel- 
ler set about proving that any rich boy can 
become Vice-President of the United States; 
the Democrats scored a virtual coup in off- 
year elections; and Wilbur Mills proved that 
you're only as young as you feel (remember 
when everyone went swimming in the Tidal 
Basin with their clothes on?). 

Ford's personal woes were increased as 
Betty went to the hospital for breast surgery 
(an ordeal Ms. Rockefeller would follow up 
on twice) and then combined with the na- 
tion's economic and energy woes. 

Coal miners shut down coal mines, cattle- 
men shot down cattle and Detroit laid off 
workers as sales went down, oil and sugar 
prices and profits went up and out of sight 
and WIN buttons were turned upside-down 
to spell NIM for "No Immediate Miracles." 

World politics pitted Turkey against Cy- 
prus, the CIA against Chile and the Russians 
against impressionistic art and Solzhenitsyn. 



Arafat, representing the Palestine Liberation 
Organization, came to the U.N. with peace in 
his mouth and pistols in his belt; the World 
Food Conference tried to feed everyone a lot 
of bull and in France, Winegate was the 
counterpart to the famous American 
problem. 

In Mississippi politics consisted mainly of 
pre-legislature session rounds, a strike at Eng- 
els and continual sniping between District At- 
torney Rex Jones and Governor Bill Waller 
over treatment of prisoners and the work re- 
lease and Christmas release programs. Waller 
continued his "Move the Capitol" program 
but found no place that wanted him to stay, 
including Southern. 

On Campus the political scene remained 
relatively quiet as the Senate failed to materi- 
alize during the entire quarter. Such activist 
organizations as the Coalition Party turned 
from campaigns for human rights to cam- 
paigns for canned drink machines on cam- 
pus. Toward the end of the quarter the situ- 



54 




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DEMOCRATS 



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ation livened up as a new constitution came 
up for ratification. After numerous delays the 
votes were tallied and the new charter 
passed 154 to 98 as student apathy reached 
new heights, or lows, as the case may be. 

Other on-campus developments were a 
mediocre football season which led many to 
look forward to a possibly better basketball 
season, a violent raid on a girls' dorm, a half- 
hearted attempt to play basketball between 
the New Orleans Jazz and the Phoenix Suns 
and the press-run of a Mississippi atlas, a 
brainchild of various USM professors. 

On the entertainment front Bachman, 
Turner Overdrive and America raised UAC 
prestige and the USM Theatre Department 
presented excellent productions of "God- 
spell" and "Fiddler on the Roof." 

By far the most significant development on 
campus was the appointment of Dr. Aubrey 
Lucas as the new president of USM. Lucas, 
formerly of Delta State University, takes over 



the president's position in June when Dr. 
McCain retires. 

In other developments on various levels, 
Martha Mitchell came to Tylertown; Hondu- 
ras suffered a terrible hurricane; Lou Brock 
stole more bases than anyone ever had be- 
fore in one season; Smokey the Bear suffered 
a credibility gap when it was discovered that 
he was starting forest fires; the Kent State de- 
fendants were freed as was Lt. Calley of My 
Lai fame; Frank Robinson was named the first 
Black manager in major league baseball; Hal 
Braswell and the Coalition Party attempted to 
hold a "Tombstone Rally" for students' rights 
but someone stole the tombstone; David 
Kunst completed his around-the-world walk 
as a British clergyman made plans to push a 
wheelbarrow across the Sahara; Muhammad 
AN reclaimed the World Heavyweight Cham- 
pionship by defeating George Foreman; and 
the Mir of Hunza was deposed peacefully by 
Pakistan. n 



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News Wrap-Up 



Winter Quarter 



The winter quarter of the 74-75 school year 
got off to a great start with homecoming 
coming late and on a Saturday and in the 
gym and with the significant development 
during the break being the resignation of 
P.W. Underwood. 

The homecoming also proved a happy oc- 
casion as Jeep Clark's Eagles picked up their 
third straight victory, with no losses. Unfortu- 
nately, it was not prophetic as the Eagles, af- 
ter picking up another three straight wins, fal- 
tered . . . and faltered . . . and generally fell to 
pieces to end with another losing season. 

Meanwhile, on the national scene the news 
ran something like this. The economy contin- 
ued to hog the news and even threatened to 
overwhelm the holidays. Fortunately, it was 
an idle threat. 

The Democrats met in Kansas City in an at- 
tempt to convince themselves and the world 
that the Democrats could present a united 
front in 76. The world, in many cases, viewed 



the whole as just that ... a front. 

The Democratic newcomers to Congress 
began to flex their muscle, a movement 
which pushed Mississippi's own "Fishbait" 
Miller out of his doorkeeper's job of 24 years. 

Old swinger Wilbur Mills admitted the er- 
ror of his ways and his dependence on alco- 
hol and went to the hospital to try and kick 
the habit. 

Richard Nixon never made it to court in the 
Watergate trials but his friends were sen- 
tenced to various terms in jail. 

Gold went on the open market but the 
gold rush turned around and went the other 
way as most of the major bids were too small 
to even consider. Mostly, there were few 
offers. 

The biggest rush, though, was for the Dem- 
ocratic nomination for president. With at 
least three candidacies announced, and three 
more strongly suggested, Scoop Jackson ap- 
peared to be in the lead. 



56 



Kansas City: Staging Platform for 1976 



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In a still present atmosphere of paranoia 
everyone from the CIA to the FBI found 
themselves in the unaccustomed position of 
the investigated and not the investigator. 

The Arabs began buying into American 
firms and American began training American 
men to train Arabs to protect Arab oil fields 
against possible American intervention. 

The biggest fights, though, were between 
Ford and the Congress on such minor issues 
as tax cuts, solutions to the energy crunch 
and aid to Cambodia to relieve their Com- 
munist crunch. 

On the international scene the war in Asia 
continued to wrestle around "peacefully" 
and in the Middle East rumors of wars and 
guerilla wars continued to be tossed about. 

Constatine lost his throne in Greece and U 
Thant, former Secretary-General of the 
United Nations died. 

Cyprus was split between Greeks and 
Turks; Ireland quieted somewhat under a 
truce which did not last long enough; and in 



58 



Portugal the major problem was a sudden in- 
flux of pornography. England misplaced M.P. 
Hohn Stonehouse who later turned up in 
Australia and Brezhnev of the Soviet Union 
appeared long enough to quiet rumors of his 
failing health. 

The Russians also got it together long 
enough to turn down a trade agreement with 
the United States because of an amendment 
governing USSR emigration policies. 

In Mississippi the biggest news came out of 
the legislature which cranked up soon after 
the Christmas break. Various representatives 
began to make various noises, probably to 
attract attention in hopes of future political 
dreams. 

The most significant areas of consideration 
were education with a big raise for teachers 
and a big cut for senior colleges and the 
press with an open meetings law which was 
promptly flauted after Senate passage by Bill 
Burgin (who saw fit to eject one newsman 
from a committee meeting). 



UNEMPLOYMENT 



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s Or,i awaits ^"JKdP 

iigns of Stress in the Safety Nets 

0° racial policies 



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There was also a good deal of controversy 
over Parchman's superintendant and the gov- 
ernor succession question. Meanwhile, vari- 
ous members of the public began to an- 
nounce for the governor's and It. governor's 
post. In one case, Hattiesburg's own D.A., 
Rex Jones, announced but later withdrew his 
name. 

At USM the news included a paltry turnout 
for Senate elections. Once elected the Senate 
took a business-like attitude, for the most 
part, but failed to produce any significant 
results. 

Bobby Collins of North Carolina was 
named to succeed "Bear" Underwood as 
head football coach at Southern. 

The major controversy which arose was 
over an alleged double standard in enforce- 
ment of University regulations with Greek or- 
ganizations having the upper hand. 

In the area of entertainment "Roshomon" 
by the USM Theatre Department, and Wet 
Willie took the headlines followed by "A 
Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the 



Forum" and "80 Proof." 

The quarter closed out with ASB elec- 
tions—Gee Ogletree taking the presidency. 
The administration also announced that the 
USM security would soon start packing pis- 
tols to protect the populace. 

In other developments around the world 
Pittsburg took the Super Bowl; the Smothers 
Brothers reappeared on the tube; Ford's am- 
nesty program for draft evaders continued to 
receive little support; Richard Daley ran for 
mayor of Chicago for the sixth time; Alexan- 
der Slozhenitsyn finally received his 1970 No- 
bel Prize; "Billy Jack" reappeared on the 
screen; Helen Reddy was naturalized as an 
American citizen; Ara Parseghian left Notre 
Dame to be replaced by Green Bay's Dan 
Devine; Ford's dog, Liberty, had a birthday; 
an Arab tried to buy the Alamo; Susan Ford 
announced that she gave in too easily to 
boyfriend Gardner Britt; "The Godfather" 
reappeared on the screen in a "Part II" ver- 
sion; Umm Kulthum died in Egypt and the 
SEC banned Mississippi State's cowbells. ■ 



59 



News Wrap-up 



Spring Quarter 



USM students returned for the Spring 
Quarter of the 74-75 school year to find Fred 
Home's double standard petition still alive as 
well as another petition on campus filed by 
Blacks. 

Fred Home presented his document which 
accused the University of selectively enforc- 
ing state liquor laws to favor the Greek orga- 
nizations to President McCain. After a rather 
chilled reception, Home delivered the peti- 
tion with 1,300 student signatures to District 
Attorney Rex Jones who immediately an- 
nounced he would investigate the matter. 

The University Activities Council was 
charged with discriminatory selection of 
campus entertainment by a petition filed by 
Blacks on campus. They claimed no quality 
Black entertainment comes to USM. 

In international news it was a poor three 
months for U.S. foreign policy but an 
abounding period for communists in South- 
east Asia. 

The biggest news of the quarter was the fall 
of South Vietnam. Slowly and then faster 
Communist troops began taking over South 
Vietnamese territory until all that was left un- 
conquered was the capitol city of Saigon. 

When the fall of the nation became immi- 
nent the United States began airlift opera- 
tions. South Vietnamese President Nguyen 
Van Theiu, upon his resignation, blamed the 



downfall of his country on the United States. 

Meanwhile, next door in Cambodia, 
Khmer Rouge troops closed in on that coun- 
try's capitol city of Phnom Penh. 

The fall of the two countries came within 
six days of each other. First Cambodia, then, 
on April 30, Saigon surrendered and South 
Vietnam fell. The victorious North Vietnam- 
ese troops established the Provincial Revolu- 
tionary Government of the Republic of South 
Vietnam and, as a further insult to South Viet- 
nam and its allies, renamed Saigon Ho Chi 
Minh City. 

The Pentagon surveyed the diplomatic 
damages that had occurred because of the 
defeat of the two nations and discovered U.S. 
military bases all over the world were crum- 
bling under political pressures. 

U.S. -Thai relations were already in pieces 
as Thailand Premier Kukrit Pramoj, in an ef- 
fort to brown-nose his new Communist 
neighbors, gave all Americans two months to 
get out of his country. Laos also began mak- 
ing anti-American moves and South Korea 
expressed concern that the United States 
could pull out of their country too. 

While all this was happening on one side 
of the world, Henry Kissinger was having his 
troubles on the other side. Good ole Henry 
proved that he was a mere mortal after all 
when all of his shuttle diplomacy efforts be- 



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THE RECESSION 



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tween Egypt and Israel failed. After telling 
Kissinger to shove his detente up his nose, 
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat announced 
he would reopen the Suez Canal. 

And going back to Southeast Asia, Uncle 
Sam got to show his muscle again when 
Cambodian troops boldly seized an Ameri- 
can merchant ship, the Mayaguez. President 
Ford, with renewed vigor after watching the 
movie "The Wind and the Lion," ordered the 
United States Marines onto the island of Koh 
Tang to rescue the crew and retrieve the ship. 

On the national scene taxpayers got a 
much needed break with a bill that provided 
rebates; the CIA admitted to paying bil- 
lionaire Howard Hughes to lift a sunken 18- 
year old Russian submarine off the bottom of 
the Pacific Ocean; and the FBI had its hands 
full with terrorists' bombings in California and 
the Patty Hearst Case, which was still 
unsolved. 

The Supreme Court ruled the federal gov- 
ernment owned off-shore drilling rights, 
states did not have to provide welfare rights 
for unborn children and Chattanooga could 
not ban a performance of "Hair" in its munic- 
ipal auditorium. 

Inflation seemed to be easing as the cost of 
living index and business inventories de- 



clined. Unemployment, however, increased. 

In sports, jack Nicholaus enjoyed a come- 
back with a win in the Masters, Jimmy Con- 
nors demolished John Newcombe in the 
richest tennis match ever held and UCLA 
won its tenth national title in twelve years. 

The Academy Awards gave Art Carney, El- 
len Bumstyn and "The Godfather, Part II" top 
honors and "Jaws" hit movie theaters across 
the nation with the sound of a big cash 
register. 

In the state, April showers brought May 
flowers and political candidates. Politicians 
seemed to be popping out all over as every- 
body and his brother announced their in- 
tentions for public office. 

Those April showers also brought suffering 
to residents of the lower Mississippi Delta as 
floods chased them out of their homes once 
more. Gov. Bill Waller also hit the road with a 
trip to the Middle East. When he returned he 
announced plans to repeat his trade mission 
the following fall. 

In his final appearance before the state leg- 
islature Waller predicted an economic 
rebound before the end of 1975 and boasted 
of a teacher pay-raise of 48 per cent during 
his term as governor. 

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, Southern 



62 



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news that hit the headlines involved the pres- 
ident's residence and one hail of a storm. 

College Board officials could not decide 
on whether to spend a ridiculously high price 
for a new president's home or an equally as 
ridiculous amount to renovate the existing 
house. The latter suggestion won. 

And those April showers were outdone by 
May's hail storm as nine inches of rain, 50 
mile-per-hour winds and hard as hell hail 
trounced the USM campus. 

In an effort to show students that all orga- 
nizations had the right to be raided Univer- 
sity officials broke up Delta Sigma Pi's spring 
formal. An appeal failed to change the 
conviction. 

Other campus news covered a USM ar- 
chaeological team who helped excavate 
1,500-year old skeletons in Biloxi, Southern 
Hall who reopened her doors and three stu- 
dents who tried to grow marijuana in their 
dormitory room. 

Mollie Magee was selected Miss Southern; 
a Student Printz survey showed USM's library 
as average; and breakfast hours were ex- 
tended 15 minutes. 

Entertainment during the Spring included 
Lynyrd Skynyrd, John Prine, Doug Kershaw 
and Spring Fever Week but did not include 



Jerry Jeff Walker and the Lost Gonzo Band 
who canceled out. 

In other news around the world and across 
the nation Portugese moderate political par- 
ties won a landslide victory over communists; 
U.S.— Cuban relations improved; and Soviet 
destroyers docked in Boston. 

King Faisal of Saudi Arabia was assasinated 
and Chaing Kai-shek, the last of the "Big 
Four" died in Taiwan. Jackie Onnasis became 
a widow again as her billionaire husband, 
Aristotle, died. 

Palistinian guerillas and Lebonese Christian 
Tightest clashed in civil disputes in Beirut, 
Lebonon as Protestants and Catholics 
bombed each others' favorite night spots in 
Northern Ireland. 

Doctors went on strike in California; John 
Kennedy's assasination investigation was 
stirred up again; and the new football sta- 
dium was named the M.M. Roberts Stadium, 
much to the chagrin of state Blacks. 

Maurice Stans pleaded guilty to five Water- 
gate-related misdemeanors; ' >^+n Fhrillch- 
man was suspended from he practice of lavv 
before the Supreme Court, Co.. ^.n Waller 
vetoed an open primaries bill; Muhammed 
Ali defended his title twice; and John Lennon 
and Yoko Ono got back together. 



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William L. Waller 
Governor of Mississippi 




Do you expect any upheavals in the state government during the next 
five years? 



I don't anticipate any changes. I 
hope we can modernize the state 
government by improving its pur- 
chasing power. We can do this by 
reducing the number of state 
agencies from 167 to 50. I also 
hope we can furnish new tools for 
development of small businesses. 
An education revision is also 
needed. Encouraging career edu- 
cation is one goal and providing 
high school graduates with a 
saleable career is another. But the 
state overall is an enviable 
position. ^ 



66 



William F. Winter 

Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi 



Will there be a move to decrease the state legislature's control over 
the state government during the next five years? 



It depends on the strength of 
each leader of each branch. It 
ebbs and flows now. I would say 
it would be reasonable to predict 
that the next governor will be able 
to work his program more effec- 
tively with and through the legis- 
lature than he has in more recent 
years. The powers of the gover- 
nor's office are what the person 
who occupies that office lets 
them be. I would say that the gov- 
ernor's office is much stronger 
than it was, say, 20 years ago. I 
think it is a myth that the gover- 
nor's office has deteriorated just 
like the legislature has increased 
its powers at the expense of the 
governor's office. The governor, 
as it should be, is still the most 
powerful and influential person in 
the state if he knows how to use 
his muscle. But the key lies in the 
cooperative spirit between the 
two branches. ■§ 




67 



Dr. Robert Robinson 

Director and Executive Officer of the 

Mississippi Agriculture and Industrial Board 

What will the state's industrial advancement be during the next five 
years? 

The industrial potential in Mis- 
sissippi for the next five years is 
almost anything we want to make 
it. While the state has no formal 
plan we have tried on an informal 
basis to attract industry for two 
reasons. First, we want to select 
the type jobs that will be attrac- 
tive to our people. Secondly, it 
would be extremely foolish if we 
didn't plan. The advancement of 
industry is such in our state that 
we can start selecting— and we 
should. If we do this planning and 
require that industry abide by our 
environmental standards, we can 
continually improve the quality of 
living. H| 




68 



Jim Buck Ross 
Commissioner of Mississippi 
Agriculture and Commerce 



Will agriculture continue its important role in the economic life of Mis- 
sissippi during the next five years? 

it is the strong feeling of the 
Mississippi Department of Agri- 
culture and Commerce that agri- 
culture will indeed continue to 
play an increasing role in the eco- 
nomic life of Mississippi. Agricul- 
ture is basic in feeding and cloth- 
ing the world. This fact alone 
makes agriculture basic to the 
economy of Mississippi. Missis- 
sippi is an extremely diversified 
agricultural state adapted to pro- 
ducing agricultural commodities 
competitively with any area of the 
nation or the world. Rather than 
there being a conflict between 
agricultural growth and industrial 
growth, Mississippi enjoys a com- 
plementary relationship between 
agriculture and industry, as 70 per 
cent of the state's industry is agri- 
culturally related. This trend will 
continue. Industry will support 
the role of agriculture and agricul- 
ture will become a more impor- 
tant factor in the economy of Mis- 
sissippi during the next five years 
than it has played in the past. !■ 




69 



Sen. Bob Perry 

President Pro Tempore 

of the Mississippi State Senate 




Will there be a move in the legislature to re-write the state constitution 
during the next five years? 



To be effective it would have to 
be by constitutional convention; a 
piecemeal basis would not work. 
The state legislature experiences a 
40 to 45 per cent turnover every 
four years. If the present people 
who have decided not to run 
don't change their minds, how- 
ever, there will be a far greater 
percentage in the next election. In 
the next five years I would like to 
see the state revenue sharing 
funds back in the state. I also pre- 
dict that in one form or another 
the land assessment bill will be 
passed within the next five years. 



70 




Brad Dye 
State Treasurer 



Will the state remain solvent in the face of increased cost for services 
and inflation during the next five years? 



Yes, I think the state will remain 
solvent. I'm optimistic; our state 
leaders have always been con- 
servative and I predict we will 
continue. With inflation by itself 
the state has built-in safeguards. 
Our problem is inflation with re- 
cession. Our tax revenue may be 
slowed by poor economic condi- 
tions—higher building costs, poor 
state of agriculture and rising 
unemployment. I would hope in 
five years that all of our present 
economic problems will be 
something in the back of our 
minds. H 



~1 




Dr. Garvin H. Johnston 

State Superintendent of Public Education 

Will there be any significant changes in the state's educational system 
during the next five years? 

There will definitely be changes 
in the Mississippi school system in 
the next five years. People are be- 
coming aware that students who 
finish high school should not, for 
various reasons, enter college to 
earn a baccalaureate degree. 
People are aware that there are 
highly respectable vocational 
fields that do not require four 
years of college. Enrollment in 
schools over the state will con- 
tinue to decrease also. The recent 
decrease in enrollment in the first 
grade has almost paralleled the 
decrease in the live birth rate. 
Teachers' salaries will continue to 
be of great concern and great in- 
terest and could possibly create 
turmoil in the state unless ade- 
quate salaries for professional 
teachers are provided. H| 



72 



Dr. E. E. Thrash 

Secretary of the Board of Trustees for the 

State Institutions of Higher Learning 

Will the state's institutions of higher learning see further integration of 
black schools under pressure from HEW during the next five years? 



The integration of historically 
black colleges and universities 
will receive continued attention 
by federal authorities in the im- 
mediate years ahead. The extent 
of federal pressure will depend 
upon the state leadership demon- 
strating good-faith efforts in pro- 
viding the historically black 
schools with resources and edu- 
cational program opportunities 
that will maximize the interest 
of the other race students in at- 
tending these colleges and 
universities. ■ 




73 



Dr. Kenneth Wagner 

Executive Director of the Mississippi 

Research and Development Center 

What is the economic outlook for the state during the next five years? 

Mississippi should weather the 
recession better than other states 
because our long-term growth, 
our relatively modern industry, 
and our agriculture make the state 
less cyclically sensitive than the 
United States. By 1980 employ- 
ment should increase by 55,000 
persons, with manufacturing 
showing the largest gains. Per- 
sonal income should increase by 
almost 10 per cent a year over this 
same time. am 




74 



William R. Smith, Jr. 

Executive Director of the Mississippi 

Authority for Educational Television 



Will educational television play a major role in classroom education 
during the next five years? 

With the cost of everything in- 
creasing so rapidly, including the 
cost of education, I feel those 
who provide funds for education 
will look more closely at the cost 
effectiveness of it all. Educational 
television can offer the student in- 
teresting high quality instructional 
services while maintaining a low- 
cost per-pupil ratio, which should 
please the administrator and the 
taxpayers. It also offers the class- 
room teacher access to hundreds 
of master teachers every day and 
that's pretty hard to beat. So, I 
think the importance of ETV will 
increase during the next five years 
and that sufficient funds will be 
provided for its operation. 




75 





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Seth, ole buddy, the day has arrived to re- 
initiate your mind to the wonders of ed-yoo- 
cation ... so it's off to the Futility Rite, known 
to those of a less religious leaning as registra- 
tion . . . make sure I've got ID card and 
packet . . . my passport to pedantry . . . and 
head for that dome on the horizon toward 
which others like myself are swarming like 
ants . . . hmm, it does rather resemble a giant 
anthill . . . glad I walked . . . Pinto circling 
around for a second time . . . vainly seeking 
parking place . . . flash ID and packet at en- 
trance and . . . into the arena . . . very appro- 
priate, holding this ceremony in the Coliseum 



. . . "We who are about to register salute 
you." 

Lessee, step one— pickup class cards . . . 
stand roughly in center and do a slow pi- 
rouette . . . peruse the signs swaying on the 
(are those really?) clotheslines . . . eureka, 
there it is, Astrology . . . ask the bored grad 
student for that coveted little card . . . anxious 
moment as he thumbs through the stack . . . 
hope the class isn't full 'cause I really don't 
want to change my whole schedule . . . ah, 
luck . . . and the card is mine . . . same routine 
for other three classes. 




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Hey, there's what's-his-name . . . haven't 
seen him in about a year ... six months? . . . 
"Hey, what's happening?" . . . "Howdy" . . . 
"Whatcha been up to lately?" . . . "Not much. 
You?" . . . "Nothin. Still live in the same 
place?" . . . "Yeah, take it easy" ... so much 
for the sparkling repartee ... on with the 
bleacher routine . . . fill out everpresent forms 
... I suppose it's important, really . . . they— 
the great omnipotent "they"— have to see 
how well one can transfer numbers from one 
piece of paper to another ... a true test of 
collegiate intelligence . . . now to recite the 
numbers to one of the dedicated listeners 
while he checks against forms . . . choose one 
with a suitably expressionless face . . . "zero- 
one-three-one-five-zero-two-four-zero" . . . 
by their numbers ye shall know them . . . 



"thank you" . . . "y'welcome" ... do not pass 
Go, do not collect semester hours ... on to 
next line . . . and next . . . 

Words flashing by everywhere . . . off-cam- 
pus males, Hillcrest, Bond, meal tickets, post 
office boxes, NDEA, EOG, National Merit . . . 
what a mob at the scholarship table . . . you'd 
think they were giving money away . . . well, 
when you think about it . . . hold on, Seth, ole 
boy . . . one more obstacle and you're 
through . . . whip out checkbook . . . there 
goes rolled gold euphoria for the next month 
. . . down the drain rather than up in smoke 
. . . either way you get something in your 
head . . . rationalization somehow doesn't 
ease your head ... as I grope for the out- 
doors and home . . . same Pinto circling 
around . . . vainly seeking. 

From the Student Printz 



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WELCOME 




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i 



The Commons 



Grin and Bear It 



by Waid Prather 

Early in the new year Southern was blessed with a new food manager to serve up the count- 
less meals to the hapless students. 

While the grade of the food rose for awhile it certainly had attained new lows by the begin- 
ning of the second quarter, prompting this poem: 

Gobs of glop, entwined with grime; 

Misshaped forks with dirty tines; 

Spaghetti and raviolli, folks, 

Enough to make Chef Boyardee choke; 

Breakfast rice and supper eggs; 

Coffee reboiled from thrice used dregs; 

Slices of turkey, transparently thin, 

In their own yellow grease, placidly swim; 

Impossible shoe leather, complete with squeaks, 

Cleverly disguised to look, not taste, like meat; 

These are a few of our unfavorite things 

That made countless toilet doors swing.* 

*Moral: While it may appear that this yearbook has just lost its taste, the Southern student lost 
his taste for the Commons long ago. 







' 





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Ik 



Abodes 



Dorm Life 



Billed by the administration as a home- 
away-from-home, the dorm, and the life 
therein, is a myriad of contradictions. 

For many the dorm is no more than a place 
to sleep and hang the phone. But in other 
dorm rooms the accomodations are nothing 
less than plush and the student brings in ev- 
ery possible appliance, apparently at the ex- 
pense of the folks back home. 

The dorms give rise to many friendships, as 
when football and frisbee steal valuable time 
from studies, or when someone, previously a 
stranger, help a drunken fool find his head 
and various other parts of his sanity. 

Dorm life also spawns many feuds, how- 
ever. Two-in-the-morning carousers inform 
everyone of their presence and neighbors 
combine stereos to simulate a harmony of 
Woodstock and the Korean Conflict. 

Each room is different, being decorated 
with everything from Rotary Club citations to 
bountiful, beautiful bosoms to lace curtains 
to the original bile green with grimy blinds. 

But the dorm room is not really a home- 
away-from-home. At home one might drink 
anything that is legal to drink, one may have 
any friend, regardless of sex, in their own 
room and not even mother can invade the 
sanctity of the underwear drawer. 




"■ 




>H, 



Abodes 

Apartment Living 

by Howard Sit 

To many students, college means getting 
away from Mom and Dad and living away 
from home. To some, living away from home 
means living with a bunch of guys or girls, as 
the case may be, in the dorm. Then there are 
those fortunate to find a "second home" in 
an apartment, a house or a trailer. 

The first advantage to such living is privacy. 
An apartment fulfills the idea of a "second 
home," especially with its "homey" look as 
opposed to the drab dorm room. The mean- 
ing of "home" also refers to limiting the in- 
fluence of the University at the doorstep. 
University rules, RA's, quiet hours, dorm 
meetings, fussy house mothers, noisy neigh- 
bors, busted washing machines, waiting for 
the security guard— none of these plague the 
apartment dweller. Another advantage is that 
visitors are not limited to the same sex as in 
the dorm. 

And then, too, there is the Commons cui- 
sine that haunts many a student's appetite. 
The question here is which is better: your 
menu (your cooking) or the Commons' un- 
common culinary "creations?" 

One of the most enjoyable facets of apart- 
ment life is the unfettered atmosphere for 
parties or any kind of get-together. This free 
and easy atmosphere is more enticing than 
the dictates of University housing. 

The apartment is the "second home" 
where one can leave school behind each day, 
eat decent meals, have any and all friends 
over, watch the television program desired 
and listen to the stereo as loud as he wants 
to. And as the "home-away-from-home," it is 
the place for one's favorite midnight snacks. 

Yet, like most homes, it's always some- 
body's turn to do the dishes. 



4- 



Abodes 



Pine Haven 

by Steve Likins 

A RIDDLE 

1. What has 296 front doors and no back 
doors? 

2. What has 296 parking places, 348 cars and gets 52 
parking tickets every night? 

3. What has 586 grown-ups, 264 kids, no cats and no 
dogs? 

4. Where on campus can you find (so it's rumored) 
white slavery, orgies, beer, child molesting, godless- 
ness, sin, sex and uncleanliness? 

5. What is Douglas's Domain? 

6. Where is heaven? 

7. Where, on a campus on horniness, is there an archi- 
pelago of the unhorny? 

8. Where does a student go after he legalizes it? 

ANSWER 

The answer to every question is: Pinehaven (often, but incorrectly listed as Pine Haven in 
various University publications). 
SCORING 

For each correct answer give yourself two points. All people who answered question two 
correctly will be issued one large cannon and inducted into Campus Security. If on ques- 
tion four you answered "any fraternity," give yourself a five point bonus. If you answered 
question number six as "up," take off ten points. If you answered question six as "any 
sorority of girls dormitory," give yourself a ten point bonus. If you answered question 
eight as "back to bed," give yourself a twenty point bonus. 
INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS 

If scored zero points or less, or if you didn't bother to read this tripe, you are an average, 
apathetic, stagnate, Southern student-vegetable, and may now return to your stupor. If 
you scored exactly 16 points you live in Pineheaven, like it or not. 
EXTRA CREDIT 

If you answered question number six with any answer other than Pineheaven or a frater- 
nity, place your answer in a plain brown paper envelope and mail to: Steve Likins, The 
Southerner, Box 67, Southern Station. I 



98 




- 






99 



Finding a Job 



The Safe, Warm Womb 



Somewhere back beyond the misfortune 
of enrollment in this institution (of higher 
learning) the great ideal of college was grad- 
uation and landing a job. 

But between enrollment and graduation 
reality strikes and the goal becomes escape. 
Upon escape, through graduation if possible, 
this reality imposes various burdens such as 
hunger and shelter. Landing a job then be- 
comes an ideal no longer; it becomes a 
necessity. 

One of the time honored methods of find- 
ing a job is to go to the old man and ask, or 
beg, for help in finding a job. Some people 
are lucky and by early next morning are em- 
ployed as a secretary in the governor's office 
despite being trained as an astro-physicist. 

For those less fortunate, help from the old 
man means a job cleaning floors in an ice 
cream plant though a specialist in the in- 
tricacies of Middle Eastern worship of 
crippled toads. 

Sometimes the old man can't find you any- 
thing, even though you won the accounting 
award, have a 3.76 GPA and a sterling per- 
sonality. In this case you wind up working for 
the old man on the farm slopping hogs. So 
goes it. 

Nonetheless, employment is necessary and 
some are so bold as to ask employment in 
the field in which they are educated. They 
have the hard road. 

So, with parents urging you onward 
(they're tired of feeding you) and the Place- 
ment Bureau as your guide and go-between, 
you set out to find gainful employment. 

The first step is a resume. This is a deli- 
cately construed sketch of your life and 
times. It is formulated to encompass enough 
information to possibly convince someone to 
hire you without telling so much that no one 
would look at you twice. 

While doing this you are automatically 
signed up for a list of coming interviews with 
100 



possible employers. By this method you find 
that Almagamated Steer Killers is looking for 
a production manager for their Anchorage 
plant. Unfortunately, you are short one three- 
hour course in steer killing. 

Some strike out on their own and compose 
their own resume according to the forms 
they find in their old high school lit book. So 
armed with the 1945 forms they tell about 
their summer job as a sno-cone salesman on 
the shores of Lake Karedatchie, Wyoming. 

Finally, by what ever route one chooses, 
the big day arrives; you have an interview. (If 
God is merry, then there are two or three.) 

In an interview, you get to try to enforce 
the good impression your resume made, ne- 
gate the bad impressions it made, prove your 
ability, retain your humility, promise to work 
hard and try not to look disappointed at the 
starting salary. 

Interviews, simply, are the only form of le- 
gal prostitution around. You sell your body 
with the understanding that technically, you 
retain your soul. 

Following the interview comes the waiting, 
the uncertainty. Everytime the phone rings 
you dive for it hoping its someone offering 
you another job, a decent job, on a living sal- 
ary. The call never comes. 

Culmination is not far away. The day 
comes and you make your decision; you'll 
make the move and go all the way. You take 
the job you are most familiar with; one where 
you do all the work and pay others for the 
opportunity . . . you go to graduate school. 

That's right, some don't make it and for 
lack of sanity, return to the safe, warm womb 
of this institution (of higher learning) in 
hopes that within a year or two the demand 
for people with masters degrees in the field 
of Eighteenth Century Prussian sonneteers 
will increase greatly and the real world will 
welcome you with a job. 




CoM, Cruel 
World 




101 



USM Construction 



Up, Up and Away 

by Howard Sit 



The presence of cranes and other heavy 
equipment on the USM campus became 
commonplace to the students during the '75 
school year. Most notable of the construction 
projects was the renovation of the USM sta- 
dium which will be as high as the Johnson 
Science Tower when finished during the Fall 
of 1976. The $4.5 million stadium renovation 
will double the seating capacity to 34,000. 

The most expensive construction project 
will be the proposed $7.5 million science and 
technology building to be located across 
from the science tower. The nine-story struc- 
ture will house the technology departments 
of the College of Science and Technology. 

USM's new University Union behind the 
Hub will be two large structures connected 



by a mall. In addition to a Student Senate 
chamber and Associated Student Body of- 
fices, the new structure will have a stage, 
kitchen area, movie screen, storage area, 
game room, faculty lounge and offices for 
Student Services personnel. The $2.1 million 
project is due to be completed by Fall Quar- 
ter 1975. 

The first graduate library in Mississippi will 
be completed at Southern in March, 1976 
across from the Joseph Anderson Cook Me- 
morial Library. The four-story building will 
have 40,000 square feet of floor space. The 
thoroughfare between the two libraries will 
be converted into a mall. 

Adjacent to the Natatorium, construction 
began on the Speech and Hearing Clinic 
which will house the reading clinic and spe- 
cial education school. The cost is an esti- 
mated $2.1 million. 

The total construction budget which ex- 
ceeds $16 million. 



Ml . t J.la 




also included renovation of the Student Ser- 
vices Building and Southern Hall and con- 
struction of four new intramural fields. 

Although some controversy was raised, the 
suggested renovation of the president's 
home was set at $254,000. This renovation 
was suggested in light of incoming president, 
Dr. Aubrey Lucas. 

The renovation of the old buildings, ac- 
cording to Administrative Assistant Gen. 
Roger B Johnson, was mainly a project to 
comply with building and fire codes. Johnson 
said that future construction on the USM 
campus would depend on the land available. 
-Land is hard to acquire and we never did 
have much," said Johnson. "It is also ex- 
tremely expensive. By and large, we can get 
more new facilities faster than we can get 
land," he concluded. 

Construction on campus greatly affected 
the parking situation which became an in- 
creasing problem to the students and faculty. 
Construction on campus took away some 400 
parking spaces. But to alleviate the parking 
problem, a new 400-space parking lot was 
completed behind Bond Hall. H 




104 




105 



Student Government 



The Faltering Joke 



by Steve Dantin 



It's Spring Quarter 1975 at USM and a Se- 
nior anticipating May graduation may begin 
reflecting on his past four years at college. 
Many facets of his past college life will come 
to mind. But, in all probability, one will re- 
main forgotten— student government. He 
wrote that off long ago, probably when he 
was a Fall Quarter Freshman back in 71. He 
got the word that student government at 
USM was a joke and for the most part, was 
worthless. As time went on he saw no impli- 
cations to the contrary and considered the 
accusations justified. He was right. 

And then Spring Quarter 1974 was upon 
him— his last quarter as a junior— just one 
more year to go. A sophomore and a fresh- 
man were elected President and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Student Government Association. 
What next? He didn't care. He knew what the 
SGA meant to him. 

His senior year flew by and so did any 
news of a changing student government or- 
ganization. After all, they had already been 
written off. Who could blame him? 
Unfortunate. 

When Richard Glenn Cowart took over the 
Student Government Association presidency 



in the Spring of 1974, he had three main ob- 
jectives in mind: expanding and implement- 
ing new student services, increasing coopera- 
tion and coordination to make student 
government an integrated part of the Univer- 
sity structure and revising the structure and 
attitude of student government officials for 
added internal effeciency. Contrary to the 
success of Cowart's predecessors, his admin- 
istration would be rated 80 to 90 per cent ef- 
fective in fulfilling it's objectives. Not a per- 
fect record mind you, but a definite upswing. 
First, the Keyhole reappeared after a three 
year absence. Now a student could again find 
out what a teacher was like before he got 
into a course. Then the "Helps & Hints" pro- 
gram—first of its kind at Southern. Students 
were finally provided with immediate an- 
swers to many of the frequently asked ques- 
tions on campus. The answers to the ques- 
tions were transcribed on cassette tapes and 
indexed according to topics. The student 
could dial a number at the Student Union 
and ask that a certain tape be played. Many 
students, especially new ones, were saved 
from the perennial run-around for the first 
time. An attorney referral system was estab- 



10(> 



lished with the local Junior Bar Association to 
aid students seeking legal advice. An apart- 
ment directory composed of a list of all the 
apartments in the Hattiesburg area with all 
pertaining information was compiled to aid 
students in securing off-campus housing. Em- 
ployment and loan programs were improved 
by keeping up-to-date information on all 
part-time jobs available in the Hattiesburg 
area and revising the rates of various loans. 
Finally, at the end of Winter Quarter, the long 
awaited USM-downtown Hattiesburg bus 
system was initiated. 

Communication channels were brightened 
with the addition of the Answer Forum— a fo- 
rum whereby students could voice their 
gripes and suggestions to the entire USM ad- 
ministration—and the continuance of active 
President's and Mayor's Advisory Boards. 
Among other things, the President's Advisory 
Board produced an open house policy (but 
with no visitation), new search and siezure 
policies and a grade review board, whereby a 
student might appeal to have a grade recon- 
sidered he believed to be unfair. Also, the 
first USM Congressional Advisory Board was 
activated Winter Quarter. 



Then the most dynamic of all the changes— 
the new constitution. The Student Govern- 
ment Association became the Associated 
Student Body. Both praised and criticized, 
the new ASB Constitution did provide three 
difinite changes: a USM student senate based 
on academic schools, a revised judicial article 
that provided for a full student body court 
system and the establishment of a Residence 
Hall Council. 

From these accomplishments, one might 
safely say that the Cowart Administration was 
somewhat successful in meeting its objec- 
tives. The main failure was in the lack of stu- 
dent involvement. The students' general 
apathy won again in this case. But that was to 
be expected. After all, who could get excited 
after hearing "Wolf!" cried for so long? 

Cowart is to be commended however. He 
laid the foundation for an active and efficient 
student governing force and he did it despite 
the ridiculous impeachment obstacle. The 
dictionary defines "joke" as something that 
"lacks substance, genuineness or quality." If 
this be the case, student government at USM 
is a joke no more. H 



107 



Golden Eagle 
Cheerleaders 




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Eagle— Carl Gentile. Barbara Burnzott, Debbie Paulik, Sherry Messer, Mildred Thomas, Barbara Anderson-Head Cheerleader. Ronald Ellis, 
Tommy Lutas, Rusty McKinley, Steve Erwin, David McVeay. 



108 









109 



Football 



Just Another Season 

by Buddy Mayo 



"Stale" is not usually a word that describes 
a football program. But for Southern's own 
gridiron classic of 1974 the word unfortu- 
nately applies. There was no chatter on cam- 
pus about "This is the Year!'"' There was no 
evidence of an innovative, confident coach- 
ing staff. There wasn't even any reai big en- 
thusiasm before the Go-to-Hell-Ole-Miss 
game. So, the season was just another 
season. 

One reason was the schedule. The South- 
ern Squad was forced out of Hattiesburg by 
stadium construction creating an 11 -game, 
all-road-show schedule. And, as if this was 
not enough, fifth ranked Alabama lurked sec- 
ond in line after Memphis State. On further 
down the list, however, cowered South- 
western Louisiana, a team hardly anybody 
took seriously. The first three teams on the 
agenda— Memphis State, Alabama and Ole 
Miss— looked impressive; but after that, 
well— there was Lamar and VMI and good ole 
Southwestern Louisiana— and more just as so- 
so opponents. 

The opening game of the season was an 
upset. USM and Memphis State battled the 
entire game and when it was over the Golden 
Eagles were ahead 6-0. A tough Eagle de- 
fense held the Tigers to only 57 yards on the 
ground. The only score of the game occurred 
on a Jeff Bower to John Sawyer pass-run that 
took in 38 yards and the TD. The victory gave 
the Golden Eagles a 13-12-1 edge over the 
Memphis State Tigers in the 26-year rivalry. 

The second game of the season proved to 
be a complete hoot. The mismatched USM- 
Alabama contest not only proved to be an 
embarrassing 52-0 Southern defeat, but also 
demolished the Eagle team physically, men- 
tally and spiritually. One sports reporter com- 
mented, "If it had been a boxing match the 



commission wouldn't have allowed it." 
"Bear" Bryant unleashed all 66 Tide players 
while "Bear" Underwood unleashed all 
hopes of a "respectable" showing. This was 
the worst defeat the Golden Eagles had suf- 
fered since their 69-7 Ole Miss tromp in 1969. 

The Ole Miss game the next week proved 
to be just as humiliating— but not for the 
same reason. The Golden Eagles were in 
clear command for the first three and seven- 
eights quarters. It was that last one-eighth, 
however, that killed them. With 31 seconds 
left to play Rebel QB Kenny Lyons plunged 
two yards for the winning TD to rob the 
Southern team of a classic victory. The game 
involved many questionable calls, however, 
including one TD leap by USM fullback 
Carlos Montgomery which the referees 
refused to recognize. 

After playing Memphis State, Alabama and 
Ole Miss a contest with a not-so-famous 
team seemed demeaning. But the Golden 
Eagles found out that the season was still very 
much alive— and thriving— in Canyon, Texas. 
The Southern Squad found that they should 
have stayed in the dressing rooms as they 
were shut-out by the West Texas State Buf- 
faloes 31-0. High winds and heavy rain con- 
tributed to the miserable night and helped 
cause 15 fumbles. But the Buffaloes stayed in 
the right place at the right time and recov- 
ered eight of their nine fumbles while the 
Golden Eagles watched as the ball slipped 
and flipped out of their grasp six times losing 
five of them. After the game a once-again hu- 
miliated Bear Underwood cautioned his 
team to "quit reading about and listening to 
folks talk about our season being over after 
what they called our three big games . . . you 
can't win by just showing up." 



110 




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The Golden Eagles prepared for the next 
contest with a 1-3 record and one advan- 
tage—a "home" game. But "home" this year 
meant at least a two-hour drive from Hatties- 
burg and for this game "home" meant Jack- 
son Memorial Stadium. Before an embarras- 
singly small crowd the Eagles battled with a 
0-4 Texas-Arlington team. The Eagles strug- 
gled out of their three-game losing streak and 
defeated the Mavericks 39-10. Starting quar- 
terback Jeff Bower injured an ankle in the 
third quarter after completing 10 of 18 passes 
and reserve QB Mark Speyrer finished the 
game connecting on five of seven aerials. 

Virginia Military Institute, next on the 
agenda, was also billed as a "home" game. 
This time "home" was Ladd Memorial Sta- 
dium in Mobile, Alabama. The Golden Eagles 
evened their record to three wins and three 
losses in a 15-14 victory. A 60-yard scoring 
pass from back-up quarterback Mark Speyrer 
to wide receiver Barry Gibson brought the 



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Eagles to a 14-13 one-point deficit. And a 
daring two-point conversion produced a 
one-point surplus. Speyrer's individual effort 
established the game-winning conversion as 
the junior QB eluded three VMI linemen and 
plowed his way over the goal. The Southern 
defense carried most of the honors, however, 
as they intercepted three passes and saved 
the one-point victory by holding the Keydets 
on a fourth-and-five, last-ditch effort. 

But the next game returned the Golden 
Eagles to the humble ranks of the losing as 
USM fell victim to Lamar University, 10-7. 
This game followed about the same plan as 
the Ole Miss game, as the Eagles watched a 
24-yard, four-seconds-left-to-play field goal 
drift up and over the uprights and into humil- 
iating frustration. As in the Ole Miss game 
USM out-classed the opponent in every sta- 
tistic accept scoring. Southern's offensive and 
defensive lines out-weighed Lamar's defen- 
sive and offensive lines by as much as 36 
pounds per man. 

So what the Golden Eagles needed was a 
team they could really beat up on. And the 
Southwestern Louisiana Regin' Cajuns with a 
1-6 record were next in line. The South- 
western team proved to be not-so-Ragin' as 
they never threatened the entire game. The 
Golden Eagles walked them 41-7. 

So having relieved all their anxieties on the 
poor Cajuns the Southern Squad arrived at 
Utah State University the next week ready to 



113 




perform. It was this game that Southern's de- 
fensive unit showed their talent. The Eagle 
defense held nationally ranked running back 
Louie Giammona to 155 yards and no scores 
while stopping all but one of Aggie quarter- 
back Bill Swanson's 10 passes. The only 
touchdown of the game came when soph- 
omore Curtis Dickey plunged the final yard 
of an 80-yard march for six points with Mark 
Speyrer converting the PAT. Southern won 7- 
3. 

Once again at "home" in Mobile, Alabama 
the next week, the Golden Eagles met the 
Bowling Green Falcons. The Falcons' most 
potent weapon was running back Dave Pre- 
ston who plunged across the Falcon goal line 
three times within the three-yard line and 
connected on his only pass of the season for 




a fourth score. The Eagles could not match 
his talent and fell 38-20. Bowling Green 
seemed to capitalize on every Southern mis- 
take—which were mostly fumbles— and in- 
sured a BG victory by pouncing on an Eagle 
loose ball just four yards from a USM touch- 
down. The plucked Eagles attributed only 40 
yards of rushing on the ground during the 
game. 

Southern concluded the football season 
with a classic 11-10 comeback victory over 
Tampa. A typically sputtering Eagle offense 
failed to get anything going the first three 
quarters but rallied during the fourth to bring 
in the win. The defense, as usual, shared the 
bulk of the burden and proved their worth as 
they held the Tampa offense scoreless the 
second half while the Eagle offense got 
cranked up. Southern's first score came on a 
35-yard Ricky Palmer field goal. A 12-yard 
pass from quarterback Jeff Bower to fullback 
Carlos Montgomery rang up six more points. 
And a daring two-point conversion on a 
Bower-to-Sawyer pass finalized the USM 
victory. 

Interestingly, that Bower-to-Sawyer com- 
pletion was the same combination used in 
the opening Memphis State game. The duo 
who proved so successful throughout the 
year both started the scoring and ended the 
scoring of the 1974 season. Said Bower after 
the Tampa game, "In critical situations . . . 
you always look for John." 

But moments after that final gun was fired 
indicating the end of that last Golden Eagle 
game of 1974, the season blurred into bland 
oblivion. It all seemed far away and long 
gone as the mediocre 6-5 season swiftly be- 
came thoughtless history— and "just another 
season." 



4t* 



114 



Resignation 

Parting 
is such 
Sweet Sorrow 



After six years as head football coach, P.W. 
"Bear" Underwood turned in his resignation. 
During Underwood's tenure as head coach 
the Southern team chalked up an unimpress- 
ive 31-32-2 record and stumbled through two 
losing seasons and four mediocre campaigns. 

Underwood, who came to USM in 1955 as 
a player, was once regarded as a star lineman 
for the Southerners. In 1963 he returned to 
his alma mater after a two year stint as a 
player in the Canadian Football League and 
one year as a high school coach. For four 
years Underwood held down the position of 
defensive line coach at Southern. And for 
three of those four years his defensive squad 
was ranked first in the nation in total defense. 
In 1967 the "Bear" signed on with the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee as a defensive assistant to 
Doug Dickey. During his two years at Ten- 
nessee Underwood helped the Volunteers 
compile a 17-2-1 record. 

In 1969 Underwood returned to USM as 
head football coach and improved the South- 
erners' record to a 5-5 slate from the previous 
year's 4-6 season. In 1970 his team added an- 
other game to the schedule and finished with 
a 5-6 record. This was the year, however, that 
USM surprized Ole Miss in that legendary 30- 
14 victory against Archie Manning and his 
Sugar-Bowl-bound Rebels. For this once-in- 
a-rivalry feat the "Bear" was presented the 
keys to the city of Hattiesburg. The next year 
Underwood reversed the numbers on the 
1970 campaign and came out with a winning 
6-5 season. Underwood's worst season fol- 
lowed in 1972 when his newly-named 
Golden Eagles stumbled through a 3-7-1 
record. But the "Bear" turned right around 







the next season and recorded his best slate— 
a 6-4-1 record. After this 1973 season Under- 
wood was named as a defensive assistant 
coach for the Gray team in the Blue-Gray All- 
Star Classic. 

Heading into this past season with a young 
squad, critics picked Underwood and his 
Golden Eagles to finish with an 8-3 or 7-4 
slate against questionable opposition. But the 
Golden Eagles, dispite these flattering pre- 
dictions, wound up the season with a one- 
notch-worse 6-5 record. 

Underwood's resignation came with one 
year left on his contract, which was extended 
another year after his 6-4-1 season. He in- 
formed his players and assistant coaches of 
his decision December 3. 

In his resignation statement Underwood 
said that his decision to resign was his deci- 
sion alone. He added that the decision "was 
not a decision easily reached, but . . . that it's 
in the best interest of my family and the Uni- 
versity." He thanked President William D. 
McCain and Athletic Director Roland Dale 
for their support and added, "As I resign I am 
able to look with pride on the progress of the 
football program at the University. I trust that 
my contribution will mean something in the 
future, and will not be judged by the score- 
board alone." 

Reactions to the resignation were varied. 
Players, who had been assured by their coach 





after their come-from-behind victory over 
Tampa that he would not resign, were dis- 
appointed and shocked. Others, who had 
been disappointed by two losing and four 
so-so campaigns, were relieve and elated. 
Golden Eagle tackle Jerry Fremin remarked, 
"It doesn't seem fair. He did a fine job and he 
had so many people against him. It just 
wasn't fair." But Paul Wood, a student from 
New Orleans countered, "It's about time. I 
hope the replacement shows a lot more 
imagination and utilizes the personnel that he 
has." 

Underwood returned to the ranks of assis- 
tant coaching in January when accepted the 
job as a defensive assistant to Fred Pancoast 
at Vanderbilt University. "P.W. has long been 
recognized as a top defensive coach," said 
Pancoast, "and he has a great ability to work 
with young men. He is certainly a great addi- 
tion to the staff." 

Underwood's head coaching career always 
seemed halfway up a mountain never getting 
any further. This mediocrity was tolerable for 
some fans but stagnant to others. Now the 
Golden Eagle football program can hopefully 
come out its hybernation and once again 
claim the high regard it once possessed. ■ 



New Boss 



The new boss for the Golden Eagles and 
named December 21. Bobby Collins of North 
Carolina assumed the head coaching position 
January 1, the day after P.W. Underwood's 
resignation took effect. 

Collins, a Mississippi State quarterback and 
team captain in 1954, was an assistant head 
coach to former teammate Bill Dooley and 
was in charge of the defense at North Caro- 
lina. Collins joined the North Carolina staff in 
1967 and for the first five years was offensive 
coordinator. During the last three of his five 
seasons as an offensive coach the Tar Heels 
led the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring 
and total offense. In 1972 he assumed the job 
of assistant head coach in charge of defense. 

Collins began his coaching career in 1955 
when he was a graduate assistant at Missis- 
sippi State. He moved to Colorado State the 
following year as a backfield coach but re- 
turned to his alma mater in 1958 and coached 
State's freshman team for two seasons. Col- 
lins coached State's offensive backfield dur- 
ing the 1959 and 1960 seasons and then 
moved to George Washington University 
where he coached the backfield for three 
years. Collins then moved to Virginia Tech 
where he was head defensive coach from 
1964 through 1966. 

Upon assuming the duties of head coach at 
USM, Collins made drastic coaching changes. 
He retained only three coaches from the Un- 
derwood staff— Charles "Buddy" Nix, James 
"Brick" Mason and Whitey Jordan — and 
added five new assistants— Pete Jenkins of 
South Carolina, Jon Conlin of Oklahoma 
State, Ricky Packard of North Carolina, Mack 
Brown of Florida State and Derrel Moody of 
North Carolina State. 

Collins said his first goal was to have a win- 
ning season. "I'm like George Allen," he re- 
marked, "I always want this year's team to be 
the very best it can be." He was also very op- 
timistic about Southern's future. "There is no 
reason why Southern can't be right up there 
with the best. It is unlimited as to where it 
can go. But we need a concerted effort from 
our players, coaches, fans, alumni and 
friends. It will take work. And it won't hap- 
pen over night." 

With this new confidence and foresight 
and proven ability Bobby Collins heads into a 
future that, though stained with years of stag- 
nation, seems to get brighter and brighter! 




117 



Basketball 



Up the Downstair Case 



It seemed totally unreal. For three whole 
weeks the students and fans at Southern had 
a real winner to yell for. Over 5,000 fans at- 
tended the Georgia Tech game in mid-De- 
cember. Students clapped for their heroes 
while the villianous team from Atlanta was 
jeered. Across the way in the reserved seats, 
the curious Hub City fans yelled more and 
more as the game progressed protecting the 
Eagle players with threats to the opponents. 
On the floor, Eugene "Jeep" Clark showed 
the age which has come during his tenure at 
Southern. But as the throng screamed with 
delight he seemed to gain confidence and 
urged his players with fist slapping on hand 
to give their all. 

But suddenly, the dream was over, the fe- 
ver died down, reality set in, losses piled up. 
Team dissension and lackluster play high- 
lighted the final two months of the season. 

Clark had stated at the outset of the season 
that "perhaps a player like Mike Coleman 
could cause a bit of dissension." That turned 
out to be the understatement of the 1975 sea- 
son. Big Mike finished in the top ten in the 
nation in scoring (28.2 points per game) and 
rebounded well also, but his individual tal- 
ents always seemed to outweigh his team 
play. Against Centenary, for example, Cole- 
man poured in 40 points but the final score 
showed that Southern had been blown from 
the courts by the Gents. 

And so it went during January and Febru- 
ary, Coleman scoring and scoring but the 
overall team playing very disorganized and 
undisciplined basketball. 

It all came to a head before the last game. 
Southern met nationally ranked Utah State 
without the aid of Coleman who had been 
suspended from participation because of 



"disciplinary action." The Golden Eagles up- 
set the 19th ranked team 94-87. Clark sum- 
med up the victory best by stating, "Our kids 
played their hearts out. This was our greatest 
win and it came over the best team we've 
faced this year." 

Was the victory really a measuring stick of 
Southern's real talent or was it a fluke? The 
1975 season will tell since essentially the 
same team that defeated Utah State will take 
the floor again next season. Lost via gradu- 
ation was Coleman and fiery Glenn Masson, 
who during his three-year stay at Southern 
joined the exclusive 13-man club of players 
to ever score over 1,000 points in a USM 
career. 

Players such as Earl Lewis, who twice 
scored 26 points in reserve roles and sparked 
the victory over Utah State and John Prince 
who has started all three of his years at 
Southern return, along with Jack Hawkins, 
Greg Prater and Barry Montgomery. James 
King also returns and if the 6-9 leaper can re- 
turn to early season form (he finished with 
11.6 points per game and a 9.3 rebounding 
mark— both second on the team) he will defi- 
nitely be a boost for the upcoming season. It 
will be up to these players to try to raise the 
Eagle record over .500 for the first time since 
1970. 

The 1975-76 Golden Eagles will face stiff 
opposition from such teams as Memphis 
State, Alabama, Pan American, Ole Miss, 
Michigan State and Tulane. Hopefully, the 
slogan branded by a sports writer in New Or- 
leans that the Eagles were "long on talent, 
short on discipline" will be the epitaph of the 
season past. If not, the 75-76 season could 
well turn into a disaster due to these highly 
competitive teams. 



118 



Former Eagle and pro basketball star Wen- 
dell Ladner stated during the homecoming 
game against Lamar that the spirit was the 
best he had seen at Southern and that he was 
"surprized." 

Perhaps there will be a day when the roars 
and chants of thousands of students at a 
USM basketball game will not bring looks of 
amazement and will just seem a usual 
occurrence. 

It has been said that once you've become 
acquainted with the smell of success it's an 
aroma that you need more and more. That's 
what Southern needs, a scent that will last 
well past December into January and Febru- 
ary. Because it sure smelled great last 
December. I 






Baseball 



Almost But Not Quite 



Errors plagued the 1975 Golden Eagles' 
baseball campaign. Although there were 
some bright spots, the mistakes, foretold in 
the season opener, proved to be the dimise 
of the 75 season. Wild pitches, Dropped fly 
balls and booted grounders cost the Golden 
Eagles a winning season. Coach "Pete" Tay- 
lor and his squad saw an eight-game win 
streak and a nine-game losing streak spell the 
end to any hopes of a break-even season. At 
crucial moments, the USM team could not 
muster the talent to win the close games. 

Southern got in the plus column on the 
home diamond, after dropping the opening 
doubleheader to Alabama, by splitting an- 
other doubleheader with Memphis State. 
Freshman pitcher Randy Jameson hurled the 
Golden Eagles to a 1-0 victory in the second 
game of the twin bill. The righthander was 
able to keep the Tiger hitters at bay through 
most of the game while the Eagles scored. 

In their next home appearance, the base- 



ball squad again split a twin bill with Delta 
State. This time the Eagles were able to capi- 
talize on the hitting of Jimmy Day, Rick Suth- 
erland and Gary Canizaro. The Eagles lost the 
first game, 12-1, but was able to salvage the 
second, 4-1. 

The spirit of the Golden Eagles was raised a 
bit in a 3-1 victory over the Mississippi State 
Bulldogs at Starkville. Jameson turned in an- 
other impressive performance allowing only 
seven hits. 

USM continued its splitting of double- 
headers on the home diamond in a duel with 
Southeast Louisiana. Unlike previous double- 
headers, the Eagles won the first game in- 
stead of the second. The Eagles put on an im- 
pressive rally in the second game which 
almost gave them a sweep of the twin bill. 

Remaining on the home diamond, the 
Golden Eagles took on perennial rival Ole 
Miss. Pete Taylor and company posted two 
wins over the visiting Rebels in a surprising 



122 



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show of pitching and hitting. Randy Jameson, 
the Southern pitching ace, put on another im- 
pressive show for the home crowd. The 
sweep of this doubleheader brought the 
Eagles' record to 7-5. 

USM, led by freshman Steve Knight, 
posted a 6-0 victory over Cannon (Pa.) Col- 
lege on the home field. Knight, in his first col- 
legiate start, struck out eight and walked two 
in the nine-inning contest. 

The Golden Eagles' win streak ended when 
they met South Alabama on the USM dia- 
mond. Pitching ace Randy Jameson devel- 
oped control problems until he was relieved 
by Rick Roberson. The powerful South Ala- 
bama team took the Eagles to the cleaners 
with scores of 7-0 and 7-1. 

Thus began the Southern losing streak in 
which there were rematches with South Ala- 
bama, Southeast Louisiana and Ole Miss. 



Posting a win over the Alabama Crimson Tide 
halted the losing streak but the victory was 
short-lived as the Eagles dropped the next 
game to the University of New Orleans. 

Tulane defeated the Golden Eagles 4-2 to 
end the season with a 15-16 record. The 
Green Wave capitalized on USM errors that 
cost the Golden Eagles a break-even season. 

Throughout the 1975 baseball season the 
pitching had been the key to the victories. 
Freshman Randy Jameson was a standout in 
the early games of the season with assistance 
from Rick Mauldin. Mauldin took over when 
Jamison suffered a pulled tendon but he, too, 
would suffer hard times. Taylor called on 
Sammy Smith several times during the season 
and each time Smith turned in a com- 
mendable performance. Also on the Golden 
Eagle pitching staff were Rod Herring and 
Doug Munn who turned in excellent efforts 
at the mound. Freshman Steve Knight was a 
surprise for the 1975 season in his hurling 
talents. 

Although pitching told most of the story 
for the USM victories on the diamond, the er- 
rors spoke for most of the losses. Even dis- 
counting the goofs in the opening games, 
many of the errors followed the Eagles 
through the season. At crucial moments 
when the pitcher needed support from the 
field, he did not get it. Fielding errors always 
found their moment to the disadvantage of 
the Golden Eagles. Baubled balls and 
unearned runs spelled the defeat of the 1975 
Golden Eagle baseballers. 









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125 



Tennis 



A Successful Season 



USM tennis coach Larry "Doc" Harrington 
termed the 1975 season as "very successful" 
in finishing 16-6 for the year. The Southern 
squad, led by Alan Carr, Dick Cowart and Bill 
Pearson, paved the way for victories in sin- 
gles and doubles play on the newly-con- 
structed varsity tennis courts at Southern. 

The Golden Eagles opened the season with 
a victory over Arkansas State. Hosting the Big 
Gold Invitational, the Eagles placed eighth in 
a 12-team slate. Northeast Louisiana, the de- 
fending champions, captured the top spot 
again, while Alabama took second place. The 
two teams were picked as pre-tournament 
favorites with Missouri, Texas Southern and 
Mississippi State providing strong challenges. 

The Eagles' home matches included Ar- 



kansas State, Mississippi State, Mississippi 
College, South Carolina, Georgia State, Delta 
State, Spring Hill, Ole Miss, Millsaps, South- 
eastern Louisiana and Tulane. 

In Southern's second annual tournament of 
the season, the USM Invitational, the Eagles 
again finished in the middle ranks placing 
fifth in an eight-team race. Northwest Louisi- 
ana took the honors followed by Southeast 
Louisiana, Belhaven and South Alabama. 

Harrington and company traveled to Ha- 
waii for a 2-2 slate to end the 75 season. Alan 
Carr and Dick Cowart ranked one-two on 
the Eagle team while Bill Pearson ended the 
season winning the most games among the 
team members. Carr led the team as the 
number one singles player. 



126 



I nt ram ura Is 



Fall Quarter 
Men 



FOOTBALL 

All University Champions Kappa Alpha 

Don Cobb 

Steve Price 
J.C. Felder 
Jim Heidleberg 
Doug Bazzell 
Allan Harrison 
Bill Leatherwood 
Terry Jones 



Richard Murray 
Will Johnnston 
Greg Poss 
Gar Carter 
Bobby Carter 
Jeff Elder 
Peter Roy Elder 



GOLF 

All University Champions Kappa Sigma 

Rich Cleveland Bud Cleveland 

Duke Sutherland Gary Simpson 



TENNIS 

All University Champions Phantoms 

Donnie Tynes Joe Rego 

Kenny Jackson 

Individual Champion Dr. Peter Durkee 

BOWLING 

All University Champions Kappa Sigma 

Richard Girard Bubba Herrington 

Vernon Witherspoon Mark Muller 
Randy Gant Randy Hull 



CYCLONE "500" 

All University Champions Phi Kappa Tau 

Caruthers, Jenkins, Richards, Kasdan 



TURKEY TROT 

All University Champions Quadraceps 

Steve Herring Bill Montgomery 

Bobby Columbar Steve Coleman 



128 



Women 



FOOTBALL 

All University Champions .Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Mary Fox 
Deborah Lackie 
Dianne Doerres 
Terri Smith 
Agnes Wilkerson 
Jeanne Timmes 
Jeannette Galbraith 



Lynn Smith 
Beth Buck 
Novelle Price 
Judi Gregg 
Stephanie Risher 
Karen McNabb 
Pat Leja 



TENNIS 

All University Champions Rebels 

Individual Champion Ruby Norton 

BOWLING 

All University Champions Rebels "A" 

Rozanne Martino Jance Crawford 

Dotty Martino Aria Degges 



CYCLONE "500" 

All University Champions Chi Omega 

Judy Blaekney Sue Fosana 

Holly Odom Linda Baggett 

Wanda Harvard 



TURKEY TROT 

All University Champions 

Meg Northrup Carol Tissue 

Gail Baily Judy May 



.Rebels 



Coed 





FOOTBALL 


All University Ch 


ampions Rebels 


Steve Rey 


Debbie Hebert 


Terry Ciacone 


Barbara Woods 


Dan Lewman 


Ruby Norton 


Kenny Jackson 


Vicki Roberts 


Darrell Totonto 


Debbie James 


Tommy Tolar 


Cathy Conerly 


Karen Poggioli 




VOLLEYBALL 


All University Ch 


ampions Follies 


Barbara Ross 


Steve Thompson 


Harla Ange 


Sam Moore 


Ann Hanson 


Wayne Walters 


William Harper 





129 



Intramurals 



Winter Quarter 
Men 



BASKETBALL 

All University Champions Brupack 

Bill Hessel Greg Peiper 

Stephen Hodges Jim Wright 

Mike Guel Sam Moore 

Jimmy Owens Ed Moleske 

Steve Jones 



WEIGHTLIFTING 

Flyweight— Phi Kappa Tau— James Burchfeild 
Bantamweight— Kappa Sigma— Brent Thomas 
Lightweight— Kappa Sigma— Harper Brinson 
Middleweight— Kappa Sigma— Bob Thomas 
Heavyweight— Backstabbers— John Jordan 
Outstanding Lifter— Backstabbers— John 
Jordan 



RACQUETBALL 

All University Champion Dr. Wayne Babin 

Team Champion Phantoms 



RIFLE SHOT 

All University Champions Tony's Tigers 

Tony Mordica Allen Saucier 

J.C. Keith Danny Cauthone 



SOCCER 

All University Champions World Cuppers 



Michele Syaegh 
Alberto Gomez 
Max Villanueve 
Armonda Silverstre 
Cris Peiper 
Carlos Guzman 



Kurt Randall 
Charles McCormick 
Gernardo Davila 
Omer Padron 
Massand Zimmer 
Gerardo Elrando 



BILLARDS 

All University Champions Mike Pharr 

Team Champions Kappa Sigma 



HANDBALL 

All University Champion Lee Daniels 

Team Champions Phantoms 



TUG-O-WAR 

All University Champions Meats 

Clemen Ector Anthony Parker 

Ben Hale Tim McCall 

Boo Smith Eric Smith 



FOOSBALL 

All University Champions Ernie Suenberger 

Sam Moore 



130 



Women 



BASKETBALL 

All University Champions Stabberettes 

Rita Grant Susan Martin 

Daphine Swanier Maria Howard 

Florence Jones Valerie Swanier 

Gennice Lenoir Julia Martin 

Jean Romain Dewanda Woods 



BILLIARDS 

All University Champion Meda Hartzog 

Team Champions Delta Zeta 



SINGLES TABLE TENNIS 

All University Champion Hamideh Farokhi 

Team Champions Kappa Delta 



DOUBLES TABLE TENNIS 

All University Champions Debbie Hebert 

Cathy Conerly 
Team Champions Rebels 



RIFLE SHOT 

All University Champions Chi Omega 

J. Blakeney S. Fasano 

B. Monroe E. Hunter 



TUG-O-WAR 



Aria Degges 
Debbie Hebert 
Renee Sanders 



Annetee Perry 
Debbie Chisolm 
Apple Hasson 



FOOSBALL 

All University Champions 



Tibbie Fornea 
Terri Pearson 



Coed 



BASKETBALL 

All University Champions Brupack 

Bill Hessell Barbara Woods 

Mike Guel Karen Poggioli 

Jimmy Owens Ed Moleski 

Aria Degges Gail Bailey 

Apple Hasson 



TABLE TENNIS 

All University Champions ....Hamideh Farokhi 

Walter Cummings 



DANCE CONTEST 

All University Champions Florence Jones 

Willie Thicklen 



BOWLING 

All University Champions Rebels IV 

Steve Rey Louise Dawsey 

Nora Carlson Terry Giacone 



131 



Intramurals 



Spring Quarter 
Men 



SOFTBALL DIVISION 1 

1 All University Champions Roundballers 

Ron Malone Tommy Edwards 
Ken Schapker Gary Sims 
Greg Prater James Palmer 
Miles Evans Carl Strumello 
John Prince Donnie McClesky 
John Cox Glenn Masson 
Jack Hawkins 


SOFTBALL DIVISION II 

All University Champions AFROTC 


John Soloman David Callahan 
Ray Heddings John Eastman 
Gary Griffin Richard Cooper 
Paul Ramm Billy Myers 
Larry Barrett Terry McAttee 
Tim Krause Roger Livingston 
Vernon Driesel Billy Kirkland 
Ken Miller Ricky Nicholaus 
Ed Quintava Steve Jordon 


TEAM TENNIS 

All University Champions World Cuppers 
Jim Dunn John Johnson 
Charles McCormick Ed Emerson 
Don Owen 


TRACK AND FIELD 

All University Champions Meats 




MEN'S SUPERSTAR 
Superstar Steve Nelson 


SWIMMING 

All University Champions Kappa Sigma 





Women 



SOFTBALL 

All University Champions Stabberettes 

Jessie Barnes Mary Kemble 
Valeris Swanier Daphne Swanier 
Joyce Wade Debra Bradley 
Lindy McCleod Pauline Dedeaux 
Royce Parker Debra Barnes 


TEAM TENNIS 

All University Champions Chi Omega 

Helen Robertson Ellen Hunter 
Becky Vance Debra Carmichael 
Donna Brooks 


TRACK AND FIELD 

All University Champions Stabberettes 


SWIMMING 

All University Champions Rebels 




WOMEN'S SUPERSTAR 

Superstar Mary Rotz 





I U 



Coed 





SOFTBALL 

All University Champions Rebels 

Steve Rey Randy Home 
Judy May Elaine Taylor 
Kenny Jackson Johnny Ferrer 
Karen Poggioli Libbie Fornea 
Paul Gammel Tommy Tolar 
Michelle Brewer Cathy Conerly 
Debbie Hebert Ruby Norton 




TEAM TENNIS 

All University Champions Rebels 

Karen Poggioli Cathy Conerly 
Ruby Norton Phil Stuart 


INTERTUBE WATER POLO 

All University Champions Gold Wave 

Ricky Wery Chris Eliker 
Tom Taylor Ellen Culpepper 
Eric Greene Martha Barber 






Gary May Cheryl Peterson 
Ken Derut Susan Sanford 
Mike Johnson Charm McSwain 
Robert Beeker Jackie Pope 
Laura Barber Steve Farry 
Suzanne Sonnier Jeff Lackey 



YEAR END AWARDS 

Outstanding Manager Award Judy May— Rebels 

Marc Irwin— Kappa Sigma 

Outstanding Athlete Award Debbie Hebert-Rebels 

David Taylor— Sigma Nu 

All University Champions Rebels— Women 

Phi Kappa Tau— Men 

James Townley Award James Welford 



133 




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Hall of Fame 




Richard Glenn Cowart 




Robin Kay Rogers 



Jeanne Grace Taylor 



Pamela Ann Stahnke 





Myra Allison 

Major: Spanish 

Association of Women Students 
judicial Board; Budget and Fi- 
nance Committee of the Student 
Senate; University Disciplinary 
Committee; President's Advisory 
Board; University Honors Pro- 
gram; Regional Merit Scholarship; 
Phi Delta Rho; Student Activities 
Committee; Student Government 
Association Role and Scope Com- 
mittee; President's and Dean's 
List; Pi Delta Phi French Honor- 
ary; Association of Women Stu- 
dents Legislative Council; Asso- 
ciation of Women Students 1st 
Vice President and President; Sec- 
retary of the Rules Committee of 
the Student Senate; Vice-Chair- 
person of Hickman Hall; Vice 
President of the Progressive Stu- 
dent's Association. 




Kathryn Sue Ates 

Major: Elementary Education 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Phi Delta 
Rho; Phi Kappa Phi; Assistant 
Treasurer of Kappa Delta; Trea- 
surer of Kappa Delta; President of 
Kappa Delta; junior Class Senator; 
Panhellenic Senator; Rules Com- 
mittee of the Student Senate. 



Who's Who Among 



Janet Catherine Broadhead 

Major: Music Education 
Alpha Lambda Delta; CWENS; Phi 
Delta Rho; Mu Phi Epsilon Trea- 
surer; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi Tau Chi; 
Pi Kappa Lambda; Kappa Delta Pi; 
Baptist Student LJnion Music 
Chairperson; Music Educator's 
National Conference; University 
Singers; Angel Flight; President's 
and Dean's Lists; Music Scholar- 
ship; General Merit Scholarship; 
Student Education Association; 
Student Mississippi Education As- 
sociation; Student Mississippi 
Teacher's Association; President, 
Treasurer, Publicity Chairman, 
Pledge Scholarship Award, Initiate 
Scholarship Award, Homecoming 
Chairman, Songfest Chairperson, 
Margaret Bunn Award for Most 
Outstanding junior Woman in 
Province XXI-W, Founder's Day 
Chairperson for Delta Zeta Social 
Sorority. 



Students In 





Janet Ann Boyle 

Major: Professional Accountancy 
Alpha Lambda Delta; CWENS re- 
porter; Phi Delta Rho; Pi Tau Chi; 
Phi Chi Theta Business Fraternity; 
Merit Scholarship; Ivah O. Wilber 
Panhellenic Scholarship; Society 
for the Advancement of manage- 
ment; Newman Club; Hickman 
Hall House Chairperson; Associa- 
tion of Women Students Legisla- 
tive Council; Outstanding Pledge; 
Panhellenic Delegate, Scholarship 
Secretary and Recipient of the 
Campus Activity Award for Sigma 
Sigma Sigma Social Sorority; Vice 
President of the University Activi- 
ties Council; President's and 
Dean's List, Alumni Association of 
Jackson County. 



Edd Brashier 

Major: Music Education 
Phi Eta Sigma; Kappa Kappa Psi 
Band Fraternity; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; President's Advisory 
Board; Mayor's Advisory Board; 
Student Senate; Marching Band; 
Band Council; Vice President and 
President of Scott Hall; USM Spirit 
Director. 



American Universities and Colleges 



Andy Campbell 

Major: Chemistry and Biology 
Omicron Delta Kappa Gold Key 
Society Outstanding Freshman; 
University Honors Program; Presi- 
dent's and Dean's Lists; Omicron 
Delta Kappa Honorary Society; 
USM Chess Champion and Rep- 
resentative to state tournament; 
USM Representative at Missis- 
sippi Youth Congress; nominated 
by USM for President Pro Temp 
of Mississippi Youth Congress; 
President of Chess Club; Student 
Senate; Debate Team; Treasurer 
of Omicron Delta Kappa; Vice 
President of Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Parliamentarian for the 
Student Senate; Lettered on the 
USM Tennis Team. 



Jimmy Heidelberg 

Major: Political Science and 
Finance 

Member of the Year, Treasurer, 
Secretary, Scholarship Chairper- 
son, Prudential Committee of the 
Kappa Alpha Order; Inter- 
fraternity Council Representative 
and judicial Vice President; Presi- 
dent of the Association of Men 
Students; Presidents Advisory 
Board; Student Government Role 
and Scope Committee; USM Dis- 
ciplinary Committee; USM Stu- 
dent Activities Committee. 



Deborah Lee Karls 

Major: Special Education 
CWENS; Pi Tau Chi Religious 
Honorary; Kappa Delta Pi Educa- 
tion Honorary; Student Alumni 
Association; Campus Beauty; Stu- 
dent Senate; Intramural All-Star 
Basketball Team; Dean's List; 
Pledge Trainer and Vice President 
for Chi Omega; Secretary for the 
.Newman Club; Vice President of 
the Council for Exceptional Chil- 
dren; Delegate to the Inter- 
national Convention of the Coun- 
cil for Exceptional Children in 
New York. 





Linda Jane Kennedy 

Major: Political Science and 
journalism 

Top Ten Beauty; Homecoming 
Queen; Student Religious Federa- 
tion; CVVENS; Student Printz Staff 
Writer; Kappa Delta Social Soror- 
ity Council Member; Editor, Press 
Chairperson, and Parliamentarian; 
lunior Panhellenic Representative, 
Dean's List; Miss Biloxi; Shrimp 
Festival Queen; Miss Mississippi 
Pageant Top Ten Finalist; Missis- 
sippi's Maid of Cotton; Mississippi 
Gulf Coast Mardi Gras Maid; Hos- 
pitality Representative for the 5th 
Congressional District; Mississippi 
Poetry Society; Gulf Coast Arts 
Festival. 



Marilyn Ann Malhis 

Major: Child Development 
Chi Omega Social Sorority; Pan- 
hellenic Delegate, Rush Chairper- 
son and President; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon; President of the Little Sis- 
ters and Sweetheart; Student 
Alumni Association; Mississippi 
Association on Children Under 
Six; Pom Pom Girl; Dixie Darling, 
President's List; Regional Merit 
Scholarship. 





lamie Rae LeNoir 

Major: Nursing 

Student Nurse Association; Mis- 
sissippi Public Health Nurse Asso- 
ciation; USM Calendar Board; 
Traffic and Parking Committee of 
President; Dean's List; President's 
Advisory Board; Chaplain of 
Pledge Class; Music Director, 
Panhellenic Delegate for Sigma 
Sigma Sigma; Panhellenic Coun- 
cil; Editor of the Greek Formal 
Rush Booklet; American Nurses 
Association. 




Kathy Maclnnes 

Major: Nursing 

Alpha Lambda Delta; CWENS; Phi 
Delta Rho; Regional Merit Schol- 
arship; Dean's List; USM Repre- 
sentative in the Student Nursing 
Pageant; All-Star Greek Football 
Team; Association of Women Stu- 
dents Civic Dorm Chairperson; 
Association of Women Students 
Sophomore President; judicial 
Board; Vice President of the 
Freshman School of Nursing; 
Rush Counselor, Freshman Coun- 
selor, Scholarship and Foundation 
Chairperson of Delta Gamma; 
Co-editor of the Rush Booklet; 
Vice President of Phi Delta Rho; 
President of Phi Delta Rho. 



Patrick Spencer McCarthy 

Major: Political Science 
President Pro Tempore of the Stu- 
dent Senate; Student Supreme 
Court; Director of Homecoming 
Activities; Presidents Advisory 
Board; Frank Allen Cain Memorial 
Scholarship; Steering Committee 
of the Student Alumni Associa- 
tion; Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Gamma 
Mu; Phi Alpha Theta; Kappa 
Kappa Psi; University Bands; Ex- 
ecutive Secretary; Co-founder 
and Executive Council of the So- 
ciety of Pre-Legal Students; Spe- 
cial Counsel in the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs; Rifle Team; Debate 
Team; Hattiesburg Historical So- 
ciety; Leon A. Wilbur Award for 
Academic Excellence in Political 
Science; President's and Dean's 
Lists. 




Robert Edward McDermott 

Major: Personnel Management 
Regional Merit Scholarship; Presi- 
dent's and Dean's Lists; Pi Tau Chi 
Honorary Religious Society; Ap- 
pointments and Legislative Affairs 
Committees ol the Student Sen- 
ate; Chairman ol the Constitu- 
tional Convention of the SGA; 
Senate Chaplain; Associate Magis- 
trate of the Student Affairs Court; 
Vice President of the USM Swim 
Club; President, Vice President, 
Chairperson of the Spiritual Com- 
mittee and the Newman Center 
Folk Group of the Newman Fed- 
eration; Vice President of the St. 
Thomas Parish Council; Society 
for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Vice President of the Busi- 
ness Student Advisory Board. 




m 

Bag i 


& 



Ronald B. Manthey 

Major: Political Science 
AFROTC Scholarship; University 
Honors Program; Alumni Merit 
Scholarship; President's List, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa; Pi Gamma Mu 
National Social Studies S<x iety; l'i 
Tau Chi National Religious fed- 
eration; USM Pre-Legal Society; 
Ways and Means Committee ot 
the Student Senate; SGA Public 
Defender; ASB Attorney General; 
Delegate to Mississippi Youth 
Congress— Superior Award for 
Debate from the Floor; Presi- 
dent's Advisory Board; Mayor's 
Advisory Board; Congressional 
Advisory Board; University Hon- 
ors Council Representative; Exec- 
utive Committee of Southern Re- 
gional Honors Council; Honors 
Student Association; ASB Execu- 
tive Council; AFROTC Second 
Honors Ribbon; AFROTC First 
Honors Ribbon; College Scholar- 
ship Ribbon; Superior Perfor- 
mance Ribbon; Outstanding 
GMC Ribbon; VFW Outstanding 
Freshman Cadet Award; Arnold 
Air Society; Newman Federation. 



Lou McPhearson 

Major: journalism 
Executive Editor, Managing Edi- 
tor, Copy Editor and Reporter tor 
The Student Printz; Association of 
Women Students Legislative 
Council; Presidents' Advisory 
Board; Congressional Advisory 
Board; University Publications 
Board; University Role and Scope 
Committee; The Student Printz 
Most Promising journalist Award; 
Mississippi Press Women's 
Award; President's and Dean's 
Lists; Sigma Delta Chi Society of 
Professional journalists. 






Lise Morreale 

Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Rho; Al- 
pha Lambda Delta; University 
Honors Program; Executive Coun- 
cil of the Student Government As- 
sociation; Election Commissioner; 
President's Advisory Board; Mis- 
sissippi Intercollegiate Council; 
Southeastern Regional Honors 
Council; Pi Beta Phi Executive 
Council and Vice President of 
Mental Advancement. 




Joseph Benjamin Newton, Jr. 

Major: Accounting 
Omicron Delta Kappa Most Out- 
standing Freshman Award; Gold 
Key Society; Thomas Nash Wick- 
liffe Memorial Scholarship-Lead- 
ership Award; Kappa Sigma Most 
Outstanding Member Award; 
Kappa Sigma Pledge Scholarship 
Award; Kappa Sigma Scholarship- 
Leadership Award; Grand Master, 
Pledge Class President, Scholar- 
ship Chairperson and Inter- 
fraternity Council Delegate for 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity; President 
of Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha Phi 
Omega; Alpha Epsilon Alpha; 
President's Advisor on SGA Exec- 
utive Committee; Circle K Club. 




Frances Ogletree 

Major: English 

Outstanding Freshman Woman; 
Vice President, Marshal, Scholar- 
ship Chairperson, Scholastic 
Award, Pledge Class President 
and Model Pledge for Delta Delta 
Delta Social Sorority; President of 
CWENS; Vice President of Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Pi Tau Chi Reli- 
gious Honorary; Lambda lota Tau 
Literary Honorary; Public Rela- 
tions Committee of the Student 
Senate; Secretary of the Associa- 
tion of Women Students Legisla- 
tive Council; Dormitory Chairper- 
son; University Publications 
Board; Singers I, Studio Singers; 
Intramural Football All-Star; Presi- 
dent's and Dean's Lists; Presi- 
dent's Committee on Campus 
Organizations. 



Joe Paul 

Major: Public Relations 
University Honors Program Schol- 
arship; Gold Key Society for the 
Five Outstanding Freshmen; Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa; Pi Gamma Mu 
Social Science Honorary; Sigma 
Nu Pledge and Active Scholarship 
Awards; Freshman Award of Merit 
in lournalism; President's and 
Dean's Lists; The Student Printz 
Staff Writer; Sports Editor for the 
Southerner, WMSU; Pledge Presi- 
dent, Active Athletic Chairperson, 
Pledge Master and Rush Chair- 
man for Sigma Nu Fraternity; Chi 
Omega Owl Man. 



Eric Richard Prenshaw III 

Major: Chemistry 
Omicron Delta Kappa Vice Presi- 
dent and Treasurer; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; Gold Key So- 
ciety; Pi Tau Chi; Inter-Varsity 
Christian Fellowship President; 
Student Senate; Concert Band; 
Summer Band; University Honors 
Program. 




Helen Psareas 

Major: Special Education 
Delegate to the International 
Council for Exceptional Children 
in New York, Representative to 
the state conference of the Coun- 
cil for Exceptional Children; Presi- 
dent's and Dean's Lists; Secretary 
for the Council for Exceptional 
Children; Co-chairperson for the 
Council for Exceptional Children 
Christmas Parties for Retarded 
Children, Hillcrest Vice-House 
Chairperson; Association of 
Women Students Representative 
from Hillcrest; Served on Special 
Committee tor Dean Eric Gunn. 



Bonnie Richmond 

Major: Early Childhood Education 
Secretary for Chi Omega; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Pi Tau Chi; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Phi Delta Rho; Kappa 
Delta Pi; President's and Dean's 
Lists; Campus Crusade for Christ. 




Lynn Angelique Roe 

Major: History 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Yellow jack- 
ets; CWENS; Vice President, of 
Pledge Class, Scholarship Trophy, 
Scholarship Chairperson; Pledge 
Trainer and Rush Chairperson for 
Alpha Sigma Alpha Social Soror- 
ity; Liason Officer to Arnold Air 
Society, First Lieutenant, Pledge 
Trainer and Rush Chairperson for 
Angel Flight; Phi Alpha Theta His- 
tory Honorary; Pi Delta Phi 
French Honorary; Phi Kappa Phi; 
President's and Dean's List; Top 
Twenty Beauty; USM Outstanding 
Diver; Greek Goddess; Air Force 
ROTC Sweetheart; Area C-2 Little 
Colonel; Phi Kappa Tau Little Sis- 
ter; Miss Congeniality in the Miss 
Hattiesburg Pageant; United 
Daughters of the Confederacy; 
Gulf Coast Opera Theater. 



MMHM 





David M. Sessums 

Major: Real Estate and Insurance 
Rho Epsilon National Real Estate 
Fraternity President; Business Stu- 
dent Advisory Council; Pi Kappa 
Alpha I nte ("fraternity Council Rep- 
resentative, Assistant Pledge 
Trainer, Treasurer; Phi Theta 
kappa National Honor Society for 
junior Colleges; W.B. Harlan Me- 
morial Scholarship; Interfraternity 
Council Creek Scholarship Certifi- 
cate; Dean's List; Pi Kappa Alpha 
Scholarship Award; President's 
List; General Merit Scholarship. 



Marilyn M. Weston 

Major: Social and Rehabilitation 
Services 

Tau Beta Sigma Honorary Band 
Sorority; University Chorus; Pride 
of Mississippi Marching Band; 
AWS Legislative Council; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; CVVENS; Univer- 
sity Honors Program; President's 
and Dean's Lists; Keesler Officers' 
Wives Scholarship; Alumni 
Scholarship. 





Pam Stahnke 

Major: Elementary Education 
CWENS; Phi Delta Rho; Kappa 
Delta Pi; Kappa Delta Sorority 
Secretary; Miss Southern; 2nd Al- 
ternate to Miss Mississippi; Presi- 
dent's and Dean's Lists; Captain of 
Dixie Darlings; Co-Captain of the 
Pom Pom Girls; Graduate Maid. 



Michael Stephen Witherspoon 

Major: Economics 
University Honors Program; Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Pi Gamma Mu Social Science 
Honorary; Business Student Advi- 
sory Council; Omicron Delta Ep- 
silon International Economics 
Honorary; Debate Team; Confer- 
ence on College Composition and 
Communication; Marching Band; 
Wall Street journal Award in Eco- 
nomics; Vice President and Senior 
Advisor for Phi Eta Sigma; 'Parlia- 
mentarian and Historian tor the 
Business Students Advisory Coun- 
cil; Vice President of Elam Arms. 





Jeanne Taylor 

Major: Physical Education 
Dean's List; Faculty Merit Scholar- 
ship, President, Pledge Trainer, 
Panhellenic Delegate, Pledge- 
Class |r. Panhellenic Delegate, 
Pearl Girl Award, Outstanding Of- 
ficer Award, Delegate to DDD 
Leadership School, Delegate to 
DDD Convention and Served on 
Standards, Initiation, Officer's 
Committees tor Delta Delta Delta 
Social Sorority; Activities Chair- 
person, Delegate to SEPC Con- 
vention and Served on judicial 
and Constitution Committees tor 
the Panhellenic Council; Public 
Relations Chairperson for junior 
Panhellenic Council; Non-Musical 
Chairperson and Appointments 
Board for the University Activities 
Council; Vice President of Phi 
Delta Rho; CWENS; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon Little Sister; Associated 
Women's Students Legislative 
Council; Editor of the Drawl; 
USM Calendar Board; Health, 
Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion Club, Student Education As- 
sociation; Mississippi Education 
Association; Dormitory Vice- 
Chairperson; Newman Club; USM 
Women's Swim Team; Greek In- 
tramural Football All-Star Team; 
justice on the Student Supreme 
Court; Hattiesburg junior Cotillion 
Debutante Club; Maid in the Hat- 
tiesburg Krewe of Zeus XXXIV. 



Vernon Witherspoon 

Athletic Administration and 
Coaching and Social Science 
Frank A. Cain Memorial Scholar- 
ship; Kappa Sigma Scholarship 
and Leadership Award; Greek 
Scholarship Certificate; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Officer in Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity; President of Al- 
pha Phi Omega; Employments 
Director tor the ASB; President's 
Advisory Board; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Homecoming Chairperson; USM 
Baseball Team: University Honors 
Program. 





1 



Brenda Trigg Morgan 
M,i|or: journalism Education 
Alpha Lambda Delta Historian; 
Dean's List; Assisianl News Editor, 
Copy Editor; Managing Editor lor 
Fhe Student Printz; journalism 
Achievement ( ertitic ate. 



141 



USM Theatre Department 

Presents 

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Greek God 




Greek Goddess 



Randy Keiger 

Pi Kappa Alpha 



June Prince 

Alpha Sigma Alpha 




Mr. and Miss USM 



Dick Cowart 
Linda Kennedy 



145 




Mollie Magee Miss Southern 



146 




Linda Kennedy 

Homecoming Queen 



147 



Beauties 




ran 



UAC presents . . . 







Bachman Turner Overdrive 



October 7, 1974 




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The Wet Willie Band 
January 17, 1975 



Lynyrd Skynyrd 
March 18, 1975 



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Doug Kershaw 
May 1, 1975 



John Prine 
April 28, 1975 







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Associated Student Body 



Sitting: Debbie Graham— Election Commissioner, Dick 
Cowart— President, Jane Fortenberry— Secretary. Stand- 
ing; Gee Ogletree— Vice President, Steve Dantin — Press 
Secretary, Vernon Witherspoon— Employment Director, 
Hugh Fletcher— Director of Legal Services, Ron Man- 
they— Attorney General. 



Associated Student Body Senate 




First row: Tony Buzzella, Myra Allison, Sherry Crogan, Becky Vance, Melinda Pope, Cathy Meeks, |an Walker, Patty Townsend, Linda Del- 
cambre, Barbara McLeod. Second row: Frank Meeks-Parliamentarian, Pat McCarthy-President pro tern., Mollie Magee, Gee Ogletree-Senate 
President, Fred Dale, Steve Miller, Beth Franklin, Brad McLaughlin, |ohn Iverson. Third row: Vickie Lynn McNair, Bill Dawkins, Barbara Knesal, 
Bill Farmer, Cindy Yarbrough. 



174 



President's Advisory Board 




Firs, row: Ron Manthey, Debbie Graham, Lou McPherson Gee Og.etree Dick Cowart, Dr. WiHiarn McC .ai n Dr. Charles Mc ^M™ 
Jordan, lane Fortenberry, Rick Carpenter, Willie V. Oubre. Second row: Buddy Mayo, Dr. Bill Schater, Roland Dale, riugn 
patrick, CO. Smalling, Berengher Brechtel, Warren Dunn, Dr. Peter Durkee. 



University Publications Board 



Faculty 

Dr. Claude E. Fike, Chairman 

Dr. Birthney Ardoin (ex officio) 

Mr. Warren K. Dunn (ex officio) 

Dr. Glenn T. Harper 

Dr. Wallace G. Kay 

Mr. William E. Kirkpatrick (ex officio) 

Dr. J. Lloyd Milam 

Miss Barbara Lee Ross 



Students 

Miss Lou McPhearson (ex officio) 
Mr. Buddy Mayo (ex officio) 
Mr. Hal Broome 
Miss Debbie Odom 
Miss Frances Ogletree 
Mr. Rich Boswell 



175 




The Student Printz 



First row: Wayne Hardy, Parnell McKay, Ben 
Fortner, Hal Braswell, Waid Prather, Little Bi- 
lly Thompson, Don Ruiz, Gil Fowler-Advi- 
sor. Second row: Howard Sit, Linda Cox, Dan 
McLeod, Herb Welch, Hazel Waites, Brenda 
Trigg Morgan, Larry Jones, Mary Jo Hamilton, 
Jamie Wilson, Lou McPhearson— Executive 
Editor, Judy Dollahite, Jan Stafford, Paul 
Wood, Dede Pierce, Keith Skantz, Charles 
Cheek. 







'4t 



178 




1975 Southerner 



First row: sitting-Nan McWilliams, 
Adele Trigg, Kathy Berry-Classes; 
standing- Debbie Fleming-Classes, 
Fayr Barkley-Photographer, Buddy 
Mayo-Executive Editor. Second row: 
Chuck Hale-Typist, John Solomon- 
Photographer, Hugh Fletcher-Pho- 
tography Editor, Chip Millet-Artist 
and Photographer, Harry Dole-Pho- 
tography Editor and Head 
Photographer. 



179 




180 




WMSU-FM STAFF 



Sitting: James Harris, Susan Wilson, Mark Geraci, Clarence 
Hooker, Cathie Cutrone, Richard Kirschenbaum, Ken 
Hawkins. Standing: Don Cain, Warren Russum, Harvey Al- 
sabrook, Denny Ainsworth, Burke Elizey, Brent Taylor, Jim 
McCool, Ron Richards, Pat Hemme, Kent Borgognoni 




WMSU-AM STAFF; 



Sitting: Bill Dixon, Diane Dupree, Mark Pollock, Odette 
Robb, Pat Leja, Nancy Kepner, Charlotte Piazza. Standing: 
Jim Hale, Carl Chapman, Steve Tew, Tricia Howland, 
Stacey Bookout, Michael Chapman, Joe Paul, Robert 
Brodie, Paul Mallery. 



181 







University 

Photo 

Service 



Cheryl Hughes, Robert Phillips— Direc- 
tor, Mitch Krell, Robin Johnson, Mar- 
sha Wilson, Vonretta Hicks, Vaughn 
Wilson, Peggy Meadows. 



183 





184 




University 

Activities 

Council 



First row: Frank Waltman, Don West- 
brook, Brian Maxwell, A.K. Wilson, 
Tim Curry, Bettie Dahmer, Bill Hosch, 
Bill Farmer, |oe Ledford, R<ur\ )ones, 
Bob Cerce, Joel Weathers, Scott John- 
son, Mike Ratliff. Second row: Lulu 
Helms, Linda Baggett, Janet Boyle, 
Pam Andrews, Rece Ray, Moilie 
Magee, Nancy Draughn, Sonya 
Stallings. 



185 



University Singers 




And Orchestra 




^WVy^'JV 



University Sing 


ers Personnel 




Singers 1 Conductor- 


Dr. David Foltz 




Singers II Conductor- 


-Dr. Jack Donovan 




Adams, Joe 


Kelley, Robert 




Allgood, Nedra 


Kelly, Karla 




Ard, Ken 


Keyes, Kim 




Arnold, William 


Kinnebrew, Corinne 




Bayes, Val 


Kirkland, Karen 




Bayes, William 


Kyle, Rick 




Bennett, Nancy 


Langham, Janis 




Blackwell, Carl 


Lee, Cathy 




Braun, Gerry 


Lee, Dottie 




Breland, Tim 


Lightsey, Richard 




Bridges, Jimmy 


Little, Barbara 




Brinkley, Myron 


Little, Jane B. 




Brown, Dennis 


Loftis, Eric 




Bullock, Ricky 


Loftus, Deborah 




Burke, Linda 


McArn, Debbie 




Burt, Deborah 


McCree, Cheyney 




Byrd, Peggy 


Marsden, Margaret 




Cady, Debbie 


Middendorf, Marianne 




Calfee, Jane 


Mims, Marilyn 




Chandler, Mike 


Mitchell, Blaine 




Cox, Don 


Mitchell, David 




Crosby, Cyd 


Mitchell, Vicki 




Cuchens, Randy 


Monroe, Beth 




Dacus, Ed 


Moore, Donna 




Daniel, Karen 


Nichols, Joel B. 




Davis, Barbara 


Nielson, Lonnie 




Davis, Lynette 


Odom, Johnny 




Dennis, Donald 


Pearson, Tommy 




Dixon, Malasia 


Pecher, Patti 




Dodge, Kathleen 


Pelt, Mike 




Eavenson, L. Wright 


Penley, Sharon 




Elmore, D.J. 


Polk, Betty 




Felis, Carol 


Pope, Melinda 




Ferrington, Darryl 


Prestage, Pam 




Ferrington, Mary K. 


Probst, Gwen 




Fike, Mark 


Rice, Helen 




Fortenberry, Janice 


Roberts, Charyl 




Francis, Rebecca 


Roberts, David 




Frazier, Smithenia 


Rogers, Robin 




Gandy, Mike 


Sexton, Sadia 




Gardner, Don 


Sherman, David 




Graham, Judi 


Sisk, Rick 




Griffin, Fred 


Smith, Brenda 




Grissom, Barbara 


Spence, Martha 




Grissom, Ginger 


Stevens, Becky 




Grubbs, J. P. 


Street, Ken 




Haddox, Diane 


Sutton, Jim 




Hannahan, Sharon 


Tanner, Mary Anne 




Hargon, Jan 


Terry, Paulette 




Harrison, Gale 


Wade, Janet 




Hegner, Janet 


Walker, Milton 




Helms, Lulu 


Washington, Cassandra 




Herring, Claire 


Welch, Robin 




Hoffer, Larry 


White, Susan 




Howze, Sheila Ann 


Williams, Shannon 





1H8 



University Orchestra Personnel 



James Yestadt, Conductor 



First Violin 

John Gay-Concertmaster 
Charlotte Scurry 
Barbara Wieman 
Nancy Hopper 
Harry McCraw 
Beth Holcomb 
Mary Beth Ramos 
Gail Longbothom 
Robert Addison 
Jennie Lou Breland 

Second Violin 

Richard Sanchez 
Doris Bruckner 
Kathy Grantham 
Linda McDill 
June Vardaman 
Paul Hedman 
Arnold Bridges, Jr. 
Margaret Denniston 
Nancy Kelly 

Violas 

Newts Guilbeau 
Alice E. Lasater 
Katherine Crews 
Jeanne Dahmer 
John Myric 
Bruce Grantham 
Freeman W. Christian, Jr. 

Violoncello 

Walter Osadchuk 
Valerie Mullison 
Joanne Karn 
Carol Kornegay 
Efrain Ramos 
Michael Maki 
Robert Conn 
Robert L. Yates, Jr. 

Bass Violin 

John Hedman 
Lloyd Mims 
Michael Montgomery 
Louis A. Ogletree 
Gregory Harris 

Flutes 

Barbara Rohnert 
Zabette Demarest 
Katie Weaver 

Piccolo 

Lyndell Downey 



Oboe 

William Mullison 
Debra Romeo 

English Horn 

Linda Pouncey 

Clarinet 

Alan Brady 
John Pleasant 
Susan Moellers 
Nancy Kelly 

Bassoon 

Edwin Alexander 
Denise Rogers 
Steve Rouse 
Ruth Townsend 

French Horn 

Fehn Adams 
Cindy Kennedy 
Thomas Hundemer 
Pat Kowalczyk 
Susie Veglia 

Trumpet 

Lee Kornegay 
David Spencer 
Carla Buice 
Mochael W. Burt 

Trombone 

James Wilson 
Mark Bray 
Cecilia Carter 
Neil Murphy 

Tuba 

Bobby Durham 

Harp 

Sharon Lebsack 

Timpani 

Evan T. Gallagher 

Percussion 

Harold Tom Coursey 

Jeff Rogers 

J. Robert Whiddon 

Librarian 

William Mullison 



189 




U.S.M. Jazz Lab Band 



Raoui Jerome, Director 

Reeds 

Dan Dearing, Lead Alto, Flute, Clarinet, Soprano 

Rick Kriska, Alto, Flute, Clarinet 

Jerry Ball, Jazz Tenor, Clarinet, Flute, Soprano 

Charles Kemp, Tenor, Flute, Clarinet 

Rick Bennett, Bari, Bass Clarinet 

Trumpets 

Louis Olds, Jazz 
Lee Kornegay, Lead 
All Herring 
Glen Neese 
Craig Carpenter 
Leo Villar 

Rhythm 

Ray Hair, Drums 

Steve Rouse, Keyboard 

John Hedman, Bass 

Louis Martinez, Lead Guitar 

Gelon Doswell, Asst. Guitar 

Evan Gallagher, Aux. Percussion 

Trombones 

David Oliver, Lead Jazz 
Mark Bray 
Dale Hueber 
James Wilson, Bass 
Jim Buister, Tuba 

Audio, Equipment 

Robert Conn Cindy Kennedy 



190 



Varsity 


Band 


Kelly Love, 


Director 


Danny Beard 


Lynette Kilpatrick 


Howard Bennett 


Jerome Kinderman 


Wayne Biggs 
Jimmy Bradshier 


Linda Kohler 


Alan Kraft 


Arnold Bridges 


Emmie Sue LaBauve 


Anita Brown 


Jerry Lowery 


Thomas Buck 


Victoria McClendon 


Glen Buckalew 


Thomas Maloney 


John Bush 


Melanie Miller 


Cody Cooley 


Darrell Moffett 


Carr Cranner 


Jim Moone° 


Jean Crockett 


John Pasks 


Jerry Davis 


Pat Pope 


David Drake 


Christy Prine 


Bryan DuLeft 


William Reeves 


lla Nae Dye 


Scott Reikes 


Ronald Ericson 


David Rodriguez 


Charles Fontenot 


Jennifer Ryan 


Kenneth Gavotte 


Susan Safford 


Lynn Grier 


Michael Sartain 


William Hammond 


Cecile Scott 


Harriet Hans 


Tommy Taylor 


Jeanette Hays 


Leonardo Villas 


Daniel Hickey 


Elise Walker 


Porter Hopson 


Steve Pasker 


Leslie Horn 


Bill Barkes 


Denise Howell 


Leon Daniel 


Eva Jenkins 


Michael Williams 


Theresa Keel 


Billy Walters 



191 



Symph. 


ortic Band 


Dr. joe Barry 


Mullins, Conductor 


Flutes 


Trumpets 


Helen Dornbusch 


Carla Buice 


Susan Glatzau 


Barbara Lee 


Karen Johnson 


Naito Noriyoki 


Gwendolyn Richardson 


Treadwell Davis 


Sadia Sexton 


David Spencer 




Mark Cantrell 


Clarinets 


Alvin Herring 


Alan Brady 


Jay Dean 


Julie Brockway 


Allan Stiffler 


Alan Brown 




Liane Hacke 


French Horns 


Frankie Kelly 


Patricia Kowalczyk 


Susan Mendel 


Cynthia Kennedy 


Susan Moellers 


Susan Veglia 


Carrie Smith 


William Ellis 


Mary Ann Wade 


Thomas Hundemer 


Alto Clarinets 


Trombones 


Lynn Basham 


Joe Brash ier 


William Braden 


Marklen Bray 


Patricia Clark 


Cecelia Carter 




Walter Cummings 


Bass Clarinets 


Gary Levy 


Morele McElroy 


Theresa Majowski 


Thomas VanNess 


Neil Murphy 


Edward Day 


Michael Wright 


Contrabass Clarinets 


Euphoniums 



Neal McMullian 
Walter Turcotte 

Oboes 

Anthony Buzzella 
William Mullison 
Linda Pouncey 

Bassoons 

Carol Felis 
Pamela Powell 
Steve Rouse 
Ruth Townsend 

Alto Saxaphones 

Richard Bennett 
Carrolyn Reeves 

Tenor Saxaphone 

Richard Blaylock 

Baritone Saxaphone 

Richard Kriska 



William Pierson 
Dwight Sawyer 
Hershal Williams 

Basses 

James Bruister 
Jerome Cumberland 
Robert Durham 
Dwight Hollingsworth 
Joe Rego 

Percussion 

Tom Coursey 
Larry Dove 
James Hamilton 
Brian Maxwell 
Robert Shivers 
Connie Sprinkell 
Raymond Hair 



Concert Band 


Dr. Joe Barry Muliins, Director 


Flutes 


Trumpets 


Vanessa Gunter 


Howard 


Dorothy Harris 


Bennett 


Deborah Hollingsworth 


Edd Brashier 


Janice Home 


Thomas Buck 


Karla Kelley 


Craig Carpenter 


Sharleen Lowery 


David Daigneault 


Robert Magee 


Joyce Daivs 


Aubrey Odom 


Victoria Hall 


Lou Anne Powell 


Louis Martinez 


Victoria Holder 


Charles Shands 




Timothy Eaton 


Clarinets 


Stephen Haffley 


Lynn Basham 




jane Carlin 


French Horns 


Rossanne Ferguson 


John Gossman 


Larmon Harris 


Elizabeth Reid 


June Prince 


Ronald Rich 


Donna Trochessett 


Dianne Sandidge 




William Watts 


Bass Clarinet 




Treasa Bradley 


Trombones 




John Cook 


Oboe 


Wayne Eldrige 


Jennifer Ryan 


Dale Hueber 




Roland Huie 


Bassoons 


W.D. Oliver 


Neal McMullian 




Pamela Powell 


Euphoniums 




John Janes 


Alto Saxophones 




Julie Krewson 


Basses 


John Thomas 


Bruce Garner 


Katherine Fields 


James Stine 


Tenor Saxophones 


Percussion 


Stephanie Craft 


Mark Chancey 


Blinda Ellsworth 


Joe Evans 


Donna Rollin 


Michael Schattgen 


Brian Bellinger 


Wayne O'Neal 


William Nichols 


DeVon Hyatt 



193 



- 



The Pride of Mississippi 



Kelly Love, Director 

Flutes 

lla Mae Dye 
Dorothy Harris 
Vicki Holder 
Debby Hollingsworth 
Leslie Horn 
Janice Home 
Cynthia Hudgens 
Tootsie )enkins 
Karen Johnson 
Karla Kelly 
Lynette Kilpatrick 
Sharleen Lowery 
Robert McGee 
Rusty Odom 
Pat Pope 
Pam Powell 
Cwen Richardson 
Sadia Sexton 
(eanne Stewart 
Elise Walker 
Donnie Walley 
Katie Weaver 
Nora Welah 



Clarinets 

Lynn Basham 
Treasa Bradley 
Alan Brady 
Jimmye Brashier 
Julie Brockway 
Alan Brown 
Tony Buzzella 
Jane Carlin 
Pat Clark 

Rossanne Ferguson 
Ivy Grantham 
Lynn Grier 
Lianne Hacke 
Allan Kraft 
Kathy Lang 
Morele McElroy 
Neal McMullian 
Susan Mendel 
Melanie Miller 
Susan Moellers 
Gloria Otis 
Bill Reeves 
Jennifer Ryan 
Carrie Smith 
Walter Turcotte 
Mary Ann Wade 
Terry Keel 
Corman Harris 



Saxophones 

Brian Bellinger 
Rick Bennett 
Richard Blaylock 
Lynn Dees 
Judy Krewson 
Rick Kriska 
Tom Powell 
Carrolyn Reeves 
Scott Reiber 
Kathy Tollin 
John Thomas 
Billy Walters 
Eddy Day 
Bryan Duloft 
Belinda Ellswoth 
Danny Hickey 
Michael Marks 
Donna Rollin 
Tommy Van Ness 
Susan Safford 
Bill Nichols 



French Horns 

Richard Breland 
Ron Ericson 
John Gossman 
Jana MacKenzie 
Tom Maloney 
Christy Prine 
Ron Rich 
Cecile Scott 
Susie Veglia 
Bill Watts 



Trombones 

Bob Bishop 
Danny Beard 
Mark Bray 
John Cook 
Lynn Evans 
Wayne Eldridge 
Dale Hueber 
Roland Huie 
Wayne Landers 
Gary Levy 
Jerry Lowery 
Theresa Majowski 
Neal Murphy 
Dee Oliver 
Glen Page 
Steve Phillips 
Michael Sartain 
Mike Wright 
Ray Weeks 






a&;W2* 







Trumpets 

Bill Barker 
Terry Bartlett 
Howard Bennett 
Wayne Biggs 
[eld Brashier 
Rex Bridges 
Tom Bu(k 
(aria Buice 
|ohn Bush 
Mark Cantrell 
Craig Carpenter 
Ted Clark 
Scott Crammer 
loyce Davis 
jerry Davis 
Tim Eaton 
Wayne Fairley 
Charlie Fontenot 
Rick Grant 
Chip Gulbro 
Steve Haffly 
Vicki Hall 
Phillip Hamilton 
Tom Henry 
Donald lohnson 
Rodney Jones 
Barbara Lee 
Terry McAtee 
Ricky Mclnnis 
Louis Martinez 
Steve Parker 
David Rodriguez 
Charlie Shand 
David Spanick 
Tommy Taylor 
Leo Villar 
Mike Williams 
jerry Yanko 
David Daignault 
Al Herring 
Steve Smith 



Euphoniums 

John lanes 
Jerry Kinderman 
John Parks 
Bill Pierson 
Dwight Sawyer 
Hershal Williams 



Tubas 

Gene Bonner 
|im Bruister 
jean Crockett 
)erry Cumberland 
Leon Daniel 
Bruce Garner 
Dwight Hollingsworth 
Parter Hopson 
Carnell Moftett 
jim Moore 
joe Rego 
Paul St. Pierre 
James Stine 
Bobby Durham 



Percussionists 

Brian Maxwell 
jim Hamilton 
Brad Williams 
Bobby Shivers 
Ricky White 
Glen Buckalew 
Mark Chancey 
Larry Dove 
Cody Cooley 
David Drake 
Billy Hammond 
Arnie Bridges 
Mike Echoles 
joe Evans 
Kenny Gavette 
Tom Coursey 
Wayne O'Neal 
Mark Posey 
Connie Sprinkle 
Arthur Deaver 
jetf Rogers 
Carl White 
Devon Hyatt 
Ken Shaw 
Mike Shatgun 








> s 



~ ,d 






Dixie Darlings 



Captains: 

Maridonna Barnett 
Eve Gable 
Susan Howard 
Liz Jonas 

Vicki Abercrombie 
Debbie Abraham 
Jean Alfonso 
Nedra Allgood 
Tina Aycock 
Patty Baccus 
Nancy Ball 
Angela Blackledge 
Lisa Breakfield 
Denise Berger 
Jane Calfee 
Kim Coppage 
Olivia Crumbley 
Sherri Cupp 
Demetris Davis 
Delta DeLa Fuente 



Edie Dickinson 
Jane Fortenberry 
Beth Franklin 
Pam Harrington 
Rhomda Kerlin 
Debbie Kirk 
Vicki Laurendine 
Linda Massey 
Jeanell Mathis 
Omeria McDonald 
Gail Miller 
Elizabeth Oates 
Cindy Odom 
Venita Olson 
Diane Quick 
Mary Ruzina 
Colleen Smith 
Karen Smith 
Denise Thompson 
Terri Ward 
Kim Williams 
Jan Wyckoff 



1% 



Pom Pom Girls 




First row: Linda Massey, Cindy Odom, Jan Wyckoff. Second row: Debbie Olson, Debbie Flem- 
ing, Elizabeth Oakes, Jane Calfee. Third row: Maridonna Barnett, Susan Howard, Gail Miller, 
Eve Cable, Sabrina Sentell. 



197 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Honor— Dramatics 







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First row: Sue Hinton, Gaylen Phillips, Don Friffon. Second row: Debra jean Elmore, Catherine Abruzzese, )ackie 
Van deMotter, Rose Mary Ethridge, Janice Hamilton, Nancy Berends, Patty Tierce, Linell Lucius, Kathy Wade. 
Third row: Larry Mullican— Advisor, Roulin Foreman, Melvin Foster, Marcia Wicks, Dewey Douglas, Robert B. 
Hill. 



Tau Beta Sigma 



Honor— Band 




First row: Dwight Hollingsworth— Sweetheart, )ana MacKenzie, Ivy Grantham, Jimmye Breshier, jane Carlin, lla Mae Dye, Christy 
Prine, Karla Kelley, Dorothy Harris, E'Lane Elise Walker. Second row: Linda Kohler, Mary Balk, |udy Krewson, Sadia Sexton, Debby 
Hollingsworth, Pam Powell, Gwen Richardson, Nora Welsh, Barbara Lee, Eva Jenkins. Third row: Pat Clark, Lynn Grier, Katie Weaver, 
Carrolyn Reeves, Sharleen Lowery, Lynn Weston, Vicki Hall, Morele McElroy, Lou Powell. 



198 



Professional— Music 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 




Sitting: Dr. Paul Anderson— Advisor, Tony Buzzella, Jim Hamilton, Wright Eaverson, |ane McWilliams— Sweet- 
heart, Gary Levy, Tredwell Davis. Standing: Mike Carter, Neal McMillian, Tim Breland, Ed Dar us, Pat Tidemore, 
David Hill, Tommy Pearson, Larry Weed— Advisor, Danny Beard, Randy Cacheus. 



Professional— Music 



Mu Phi Epsilon 




First row: Gail Harrison, Lynn Basham, Cathy Lee, Carla Kelly, Mary Anne Tanner, Nancy Bennett, Path Pecer, 
Robin Rogers. Second row: Janice McCall, Carol Felis, Susan Moeliers, Ruth Nelson, lessica Schillirs, Janice 
Laugham. Third row: Elizabeth Doan, Susan Bradshaw, Barbara Little, Paula Godwin, Sharon Penle\ , Dr. Vivian 
Wood— Advisor, Martha Spence, Vicki Hall, Pam Prestage. 



199 



Sigma Delta Chi 




Sitting: Kathy (armon, Buddy Mayo, Dede Pierce, Barbara lones, Judy Hollingsworth, Mack Deaver, Linda Kennedy, Brenda Trigg Morgan, 
Susan Norman, |an Stafford, Lou McPherson, Gilbert Fowler, jr., Susan Prouty, )erry Parsons, Pam Andrews, Dr. Gene Wiggins— Advisor, Dr. Bert 
Ardoin. Standing: Charlie Cheek, Bill Short, Hal Braswell, Richard Dube, Kim Gianokos, Koksal Turk, Robert Carmichael, Vickie Field, Mary )o 
Hamilton, Lawrence lones, Howard Sit, Keith Skantz, Henry Rosenbush, Paul Woody Wood, Philip D. Ward. 



200 



Student Religious Federation 



JEREMIAH PEOPLE 



NORMAN & SANDRA 




ANDREW CROUCH & THE DISCIPLES 



JIM WARD 



201 



Wesley Foundation 



Wesley Foundation is the United 
Methodist Ministry on campus. Here 
such spiritual growth is sought that stu- 
dents may emerge from their educa- 
tional experiences prepared to witness 
to the Christian Gospel in every area of 
life. 




Rev. Marshall Burnett, )r., Director 




The Wesley Foundation Building located in the Southwest corner of the campus. 




Wesley Foundation Student Council: Su- 
san Moellers-Treasurer, Richard Kir- 
scheulsaum-Secretary, Carol Burnett- 
Publicity Chairman, Dee Ellis-Vice Pres- 
ident, Clarisse Thompson-President. 
Not pictured: Cathy Wells-Wesley 
"News" editor, |ohn Solomon— Student 
Religious Federation Representative. 



202 



Baptist Student Union 





Officers: Gale Harrison, Churchmanship; Earl Bowie, President; Kath\ West, Missions; Tom Long, Publicity; Corotrn Smith, 
Vuherd Editor; lanet Broadhead, Music; Skip Noble, Associate Director; Glenn Ma\, student Center Director, Vlyra Taylor, 
Worship Director; Carol Ann Lowther, Fellowship Director; Marsh ludge, Director of Records; Donnie Steuart, Ministry; 
Rev. Louie Farmer, Director. 



203 



Maranatha: "The Lord Cometh 



n 




First row: Carl Schaef, Ximcha Munoz, Carol Felis, Nancy Kepner, Sonny Kethchum, Eve Lundy, Danny Tinsler, Dr. Arnold Krubsack-Advisor. 
Second row: Julia Burgett, Francis McGill, Russell Sauls, Dale Edenfield, Dick Brown, Charlotte Cook, Paula Gregory, Melvin Foster, Ellen 
Fulcher. 

Maranatha, a group of students, faculty and staff who love the Lord jesus, get together with 
each other to share what He has done in each of our lives. Our meetings, characterized by 
spiritual song, prayer for thos in need and a predominating warmth and love for one another, 
are attended by Christians of all faiths including Baptists, Methodists, Catholics, Presbyterians, 
Episcopalians, Pentecostals, Lutherans and many others. Out meetings are open to all. 

"Maranatha," a greeting used frequently almost two thousand years ago by the New 
Testament Christians, means, "The Lord Cometh." And indeed He is coming, soon. That is way 
at this University Maranatha means not only the soon return of our King, but also a joyful 
fellowship of brothers and sisters who love and care about all people. We want all people to be 
a part of the new Kingdom worshiping the Lord Jesus in the Spirit and in truth. We believe that 
when we meet, Jesus is in our midst and that when we agree about anything in prayer, God 
hears us and grant us what we ask. No matter what our needs, troubles or problems, we know 
that God loves us and will do something about them if we only ask Him. Above all, Jesus 
Himself is that which we seek. 



204 



Koinoia Club 




Officers: Joe Smith, Karen Strong, Nancy Miller 
(sitting), Sam Barham, Cathy Lee, Bob Bishop. 



205 



Business Students 
Advisory Council 




First row: Dr. Joseph Greene-Advisor, Robert C. Thomas, |r., Frances Weber, David Sessums, )udith Moore, Donnie Tynes, Michael Greene. 
Second row: Joseph Morgan, Roderick Posey, Trellis Green, Robert Lewis, Ralph Brubaker, David Senne. Not Pictured: Robert McDermott, 
Elizabeth Kerley, Darlene Lott. 



206 



Honor— Business 



Delta Sigma Pi 




First row: Dr. Tom Smith— Advisor, Dick Minerley, Alan Hinton, Gene Owens, Alton Stone, David Baker, Todd Messee, 
Bob Lee. Second row: Doug Scott, Paul Theobald, Randy Ladner, Bill Dawkins, Ralph Brubaker, Paul Garrett, Ernie Luen- 
berger. Third row: Ron McCollugh, David Thompson, Tom Covington, Bob Byard, |im Howell, Steve Moret, |oe Morgan, 
Richard Donnell, Dr. Gerald Morgan— Advisor. 




Officers 



First row: Bob Lee-President, David Baker— Chancellor, Ralph Brubaker— Senior Vice President, Richard Don- 
nell— Vice President of Pledge Education. Second row: Doug Scott— C.E.I. Chairman, Gene Owens— Secretary, 
Tom Covington— Vice President of Professional Activities. Not pictured: Bill Odom— Historian, Steve Strickland- 
Social Chairman, |im Rhoden— Treasurer. 



207 



USM Collegiate Chapter- 
American Marketing Association 




First row: jean Windom, Janet Ingram, Beth Kurley— President Elect, Anita Prather— President, Celeste Prisock, Mary Ann Walterson, Lu Ann 
McGinnis. Second row: David Morton, Keith Fortenberry, Rie Hawkins, Vicki Hall, Greg Cooper, Lenny Rupp, George Pearl— Vice President, 
(on Schoneck, Alvin Underwood. Third row: Tommy Parnell, Donald Bourne, Mike Green, Stephen Bunch, Brad McLaughlin, Gary Foltz, Dr. 
William Schoell— Advisor, Doug Scott. 



208 



Society for the 
Advancement of Management 




First row: Lu Ann McCinnis, Mildred McLaughlin, Cilda Quan, Ann Hodge, lanet Boyle. Second row: Steve Moret, Ernie Levenberger, Dr. R.N. 
Moore-Advisor, Robert McDermott. 



209 



Alpha Epsilon Alpha 


Honorary- 


-Accounting 


James Marcus Broom 


Judy Lynn Moore 




Stephen Albert Brown 


Joe Morgan 




Philip Bush 


Lanell Claire Morris 




Donna Ruth Carlisle 


Cynthia Louise Murray 




Sheron Joy Covington 


Joseph B. Newton 




Richard Glenn Cowart 


Daniel Lee O'Neal 




Joyce Marlene Craft 


David Quinton Otwell 




Philip Paul Dellenger 


Yancy Lee Patrick 




Dave Fowler 


Patrick Dan Phillips 




Betty K. Foretich 


Jamie Ruth Reynolds 




Alan Lane Freeman 


Robert Freddie Sistrunk 




Edward Cifford 


John H. Smith 




Albert Andrew Goodin 


Lauris Smith 




Stephen William Gray 


Reggie Smith 




Sherry Diane Grogan 


H. Eugene Spring 




Susan Hamil 


Thomas Gregory Stricklin 




Stanley Harrell 


Susan Lane Stringer 




Marion Princy Cook Harrison 


James L. Su 




Stephen Charles Hirn 


Michael B. Thornton 




Elizabeth Ann Hungerford 


Edgar Andy Thrower 




Sally S. Johnson 


Gary Dean Tucker 




Kay Ann Katzenmeyer 


Murray Underwood 




Bob Grissom Kilpatrick 


Catherine Ann Van Buren 




Mark Anthony Kitchens 


Donald Lee Wade 




Judson D. Langston 


Richard Allen Wilder 




Robert Welborn Lewis 


David Bruce Wiley 




Richard Alan Liston 


Donna Marie Williams 




Anne Marie Logue 


Howard Andrew Williams 




Michael Steven Luehlfing 


Otis Wingo Young 




Richard Wayne McCullough 


Graduate Students: 




Daniel Hung-Fat Ma 


John Albert Brown 




Jerry D. Mayo 


James Michael Lightsey 




R. R. Minerly 


Marvel Turner 




Brian Kent Miller 







210 



Professional— Business 



Phi Chi Theta 




First row: Sherry Crogan, Elizabeth Hurgerford, Lannell Morris, Dee Dee Bonderaut. Second row: Sharon Covington, Donna Williams, )anet 
Boyle, Frances Weber, LuAnn McGinnis. Third row: Sara Allen, lean Windham, Cindy Reynolds, Suzanne Yelverton, Donna Carlisle, Ann 
Hodge 



211 



Beta Chi Chapter- Beta Beta Beta 



Honor— Biology 




Seated: Dennis Storey— Treasurer, Janice La Munyon— Historian, Mary Groves, Gail Kuhnert— Secretary. Standing: Chris Swalm, 
Dr. |ames Larsen— Advisor, Robert McManus, Richard Daniel, M.K. Upshaw, Dianne Green— President, Ruth Rayborn, Ed Wil- 
liamson—Vice President. Not pictured: Steve Minor, Stanley Kinberger, Sandra Greene. 

American Chemical Society Student Affiliates, 
USM Chapter 

Honor— Chemistry 




Seated: Bill Kirkland, Paul Dilley, Kathy Hyatt, Turner Billingsley, Pam Nix. Standing: Dr. Fred Hawkridge-Advisor, 
jimmy Page, Bill joice, Mary McCraw, Jeff Beche, lames White, Dr. Douglas, C. McCain-Advisor. 



212 



Medical Technology Club 




First row: Darlene Baldwin, Robert Nicholas, Larry Main— President , Belva Shaw. Second row: Ricky Winstead, Laluana 
Turner, Patsy Bulter, Pam Padgett, Gail Everett. Third row: David Chen, Scott Finley, Zula Wilson, Carrie Roberts. Fourth 
row: Mike Dorcik, Lucy lohnson, Renee Dulirrson, Susan Nobles, Kim Manning. Fifth row: Robert Crews-Advisor, George 
Harwell— Instructor, jane Hudson-Instructor, )ane Wester— Instructor, Kathy O'Neal, Ron Edwards. 

USM Student Speech and Hearing Association 




First row: Kenneth Henshaw, Richard Bartlett, Craig Dowling, Anita McNeese, (ane Grady, Audre\ Eckles, Paula Hol- 
lingsworth, Diane Major. Second row: Adrian Tureand, Mary Ross Sowell, Dottie Cocefield, Susan Salvagno, Debra Lodin. 
Third row: Shelia Graves, Nancy Sellers, Lela Perkins, Betsy Nardechlia, )anet Beckman, Ann Miller, Beth Tempel, Beck\ 
Wise. Fourth row: Sue Young, Pam Holliman, Charles Moore, Dee Irons, Ann Stokes, Shanna Spillman, Perri Roberts. 



213 



Alpha Phi Omega 



Service 




Mark Muller, Bill Dawkins, Tom Magehee, Charlie Hall, Scott Sims, Ron Manthey, Gee Ogletree, Bob McDermott, Oliver Shearer, Wayne Cain, 
|im Borsig, Vernon Witherspoon, Charlie Powell, Brandt Schmersahl 



214 



Afro-American Cultural Society 




i 



First row: Beverly Crumbly, luanita Sims, Arthur McGee, Ada Crosby, Arthur Walker, Arleen Johnson, Maurice Singleton. Second row: )oe 
Brown, Donnell Moffitt, Clifton Hawkins, Mary Moore, Patricia Perry, Henry Gavin. Third row: Mark LeFlore, Dianne Cooley, Cheryl Washing- 
ton, Ronald Jordan, Marcia Wicks. Fouth row: Ben Hales, Fred Anderson, Curtis Dickey, lackie McPharland. 



215 



Mini Quarter Facilitators 




First row: Mart Martin, Mildred Thomas, Charlie Gentry, )enny McKellar. Second row: Lynn Daniels, Carolyn Carson, )eannie Deen, Debbie 
Thompson, Cheryl Moffett. Third row: Cliff Reynolds, Paul Phillips, Beth Parker, Mike Sartain, Ron lordan. 

The Mini Quarter facilitators assist all new students who pre-register during the summmer for 
the Fall Quarter in a small group atmosphere. Freshmen and transfer students get acquainted 
with University structure policies and procedures, and with the USM campus-its atmosphere, 
faculty, students, organizations and physical layout. 



216 



Collegiate Civitan 




First row: Becky Vance, Karen Clinton, Holly Odom, )ody Blackney. Second row: Elizabeth LeNoir, Jenny Mckellar, Cy- 
nthia Smith, Jeanne Coss, Helen Robertson. Third row: Debbie Holdren, Charlie Gentry, |udy Stringer, Oscar Paulson- 
Advisor. 

Library Science Student Organization 




Seated: Sylvia Seward, Beth Stewart, Debbie^ Carpenter, |udy Little, Dr. Dorothy Pierson-Advisor. Standing: Hank Long, kath\ 
Byrd, )oe Tynes, Kenneth Welch, Gail Davis, Sue Sorenson, Howard Statum, Marian Riple\ , Lidia Darnell, Stanlev Hastings. 



217 



Kappa Omicron Phi 



Honor— Home Economics 




First row: Gail Brison. Second row: Susan Seddeth, Judy Ward, Beverly Harden. Third row: Carol Ann Louther, Mecia Fuss- 
ell, Laura Serry, Shirley Williams. Fourth row: Phyllis Cipson, Barbara Quav, Nieda Beaugez, Vickie Havard, Dr. Louella 
Milner-Advisor, Adele Trigg. 



Home Economics Club 




Seated: Mollie Magee, Adele Trieg, Phyllis Cipson, Amanda Reynolds, Myra Taylor, )anet Speed, Marsh Siebels. Standing: Mrs. 
Linda Donnell-Co-sponsor, )udy Ward, Beverly Harden, Linda Rutland, Brenda Minter, Yvonne Waters, Mittielee Walton, Nieda 
Beaugez, Virginia Grady, Shirley Williams, Carol Ann Lowther, Elizabeth Byrd, Olivia Crumbley, Clarisse Thompson. 



218 



Honor— Mathematics 



Kappa Mu Epsilon 




Jack Munn— Avisor, Cheryl Goodman, Eddie Orr, Kim Henderson, Sherry Fortenberry, Alice Essary, Ricky Newly, Ed 
Oxford, Beth Montgomery, Porter Webster, Francis Weber, Dr. |oe Morrel-Advisor, Harry Dole. Not pictured: Hugh 
Fletcher. 



National Honor Society in History 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Faculty Advisor 



Tim Hudson 
Walter Herbst 
Kit Bakker 
Dr. Orazio Ciccarel 



Mary Elizabeth Bauer 

Charlotte W. Black 

Richard Burris 

Blannie Curtis 

Robert S. Field 

William Finley 

Robert Giebeig 

Max C. Johnson, Jr. 

William Edwards Kirby 

Jon Lewis 

Lames Massengale 

Patrick Spencer McCarthy 

William F. Niblett, Jr. 

Gary Norman 

Don Patterson 

Scott Burdine Richmond 

Lynn Roe 

Patrick M. St. Romain 

David Lesley Senter 

Earl C. Smith 



Phi Alpha Theta 



Jolane Springston 

Deanne Stephens 

Daniels J. Thelen 

Kenneth Weir 

Elizabeth A. Whiddon 

J. P. White, Jr. 

Dr. Jay P. Anglin 

Richard H. Bowers 
Robert A. Brent 
J. Theadwell Davis 
John E. Gonzales 
Glen T. Harper 

Professor Howard Jones 

Dr. William D. McCain 

Dr. Kenneth G. McCarthy 

Dr. Neil R. McMiller 

Dr. William K. Scarborough 

Dr. William T. Schmidt 

Dr. John R. Skates 

Dr. Leon A. Wilbur 



Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 



219 



Phi Eta Sigma 



Freshmen Men's Honorary 




David Michael Barr 
Thomas Merrill Bass 
Brian James Blount 
Wayne Craig Cain 
William Pui-kwan Chung 
Jerry Don Deas 
Earl Franklin Deibler 
Brian Patrick Donovan 
Wayne Phillip Ducomb, Jr. 
Richard M. Farquhar 
Larry Thomas Fortenberry 
Van Andrews Fortenberry 
Jerry Michael Geimer 
William Lee Geoghagan 
Paul Alan Harris 
Kenneth Bruce Hauser 
Marvin E. Hetherington 
Donald William Huch 



Nathan Mark Johnson 
Robert Donald Jordan 
Jon Anthony Keary 
Joseph Leonard Kozak 
Jerrery Earl Lackey 
Ricky Van Ladner 
Gerry Henderson Lovins 
Jack Grant McDermid 
Jimmy Dean McLeod 
Joseph Wayne Moore 
John Lowe Odom 
Joseph Brandon Parish 
Michael Vincent Ratliff 
James Floyd Stanovich 
Charles E. Suffling 
Walter Kevin Ware 
Gregory J. Worthington 
Wai Sang Yam 



220 



Freshmen Women's Honorary 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


President Carolyn Carson 


Alpha Lambda Delta is a national society for women 


Vice-President Kim Kimbrough 


which honors high scholastic achievement during the 


Secretary Beverly Windham 


first year in college. The purpose of the organization is to 


Treasurer Janet Muse 


promote intelligent living and a high standard of learning 


Historian Catherine Waites 


and to encourage superior scholastic attainment among 




the freshmen women in all colleges and universities. 


Members Tapped Winter, 


1974-75 Susan Lynne Mendel 


Cindy Dvonne Alexander 


Marianne Middendorf 


Cynthia Elaine Allen 


Donna Lynn Moore 


Linda Diane Baggett 


Catherine Mary Muller 


i Katheryn Elizabeth Berry 


Elizabeth C. Jults Murray 


Julie Chere Brockway 


Pamela Lynn Nail 


Sandra Marie Brown 


Linda L. Smith Patterson 


Sharon Lynn Brown 


Beverly Ransom 


Mary Ann Bruner 


Patricia Rehfeldt 


Pamela Jane Bush 


Judith Diana Russell 


Theresa Cosette Bush 


Catherine Louise Spies 


Deborah Rose Cady 


Laura Elisa Stafford 


Carolyn R. Carson 


Dorothy Diane Tyner 


Linda Carol Cole 


Jerri Lynn Wasmer 


Jo Etta Cutrer 


Dessa Ophelia Welbom 


Susan Dallas 


Clare Therese Wilson 


Edith Saslof Dickinson 


Beverly Ann Windham 


Becky Jill Fallon 




Mary Theresa Freibert 




Cheryl Ann Coetz 


Members Tapped Spring, 1975 


Kathryn Ann Hamrick 


Leslie Fayr Barkley 


Ann Hanson 


Beverly Blanch Carroll 


Donna Alice Hill 


Sandra Diane Carter 


Karen Ann Johnson 


Sharon Mary Chavez 


Nancy Joanne Kepner 


Donna Sue Doggett 


Kimble Rene Keyes 


Angela Nell Edwards 


Karen Anne Kimbrough 


Margaret Dawson Hurley 


Karen Elizabeth Kirkland 


Marsha Lambert 


Barbara C. Knesal 


Connie Meiler MacKay 


Julia Ann Krewson 


Kathy Anne Mowery 


Gail Annette Kuhnert 


Janet Darlene Muse 


Theresa Jean Leavitt 


Mary Teressa Ann Reid 


Dorothy June Lee 


Georgia Sue Rogers 


Sharleen Gail Lowery 


Valerie Jo Sanford 


Ruth Anne Malone 


Dawn Straitiff 


Andrea K. Matthews 


Stephanie Jeanne Timms 


Patricia Anne McNary 


Catherine Waites 


Deborah Jeane Meitzler 


Janice Ann Walker 



221 



The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 



William Gary Arbosat 

Gwendolyn M. Atkisson 

Katheryn Gibson Bakker 

Carlyn Bass 

Roger Earl Bowie 

Patricia Lunsford Braddock 

Frederick William Braden 

•Bradley Ellis Bryne 

Andrew Foil Campbell 

Mary Jo Campbell 

Nora Jean Carlson 

Phyllis Marie Carter 

Garry B. Chandler 

Dorothy Thomas Cockfield 

Betty Rae Collins 

Debra Colleen Colvin 

Stephen L. Conerly 

Richard Glenn Cowart 

Ralph D. Cross 

Blannie Martha Curtis 

Jeannie Marie Deen 

Claudia Margaret Dennis 

Rogers Joseph Druhet, III 

Sherry Ann Fortenberry 

Hilke Frayer 

Sandra K. George 

Stephen Ross Graben 

Beverly Sue Harden 

William O. Henry 

Lynda C. Holbrook 

Mary Jane Hornsby 

Joseph Donald Howell 

Randall L. Hudson 

Tim William Hudson 

Truda Jane Booker Jackson 

Earl L. Jacobs 

Paula Josephine Jameson 

Gerald R. Jeffers 

Jeanne Celeste Jones 

Samuel Wayne Keyes, Jr. 

John Ralph King, Jr. 

Bonnie Hails Morgan Kirkland 

Mary Anne Lee 

Donna Marie Lewis 

Helen Irene Little 

Bryan Frank McCraw 

Therese Tupper McCurdy 

Lucy Mercile Mcllwain 

Diane Daria Major 

Ronald E. Manthey 

Arthur Anthony Marubbio, Jr. 

William Dale Massey 

Beda M. Masters 

Catherine Elizabeth Meeks 

Sherry Lee Mills 



Cynthia Walker O'Brian 

Frances Bess Ogletree 

Dorothy A. Pearson 

Rebecca Ellen Banks Peddicord 

Diane Teresa Peranich 

John Vernon Petro, Jr. 

Betty S. Polk 

Neil Powe 

Eric Richard Prenshaw, III 

David Presser 

Gwendolyn M.V. Privetera 

William R. Rainey 

George G. Ramsay 

Kitty Anne Rauch 

Mildred Anne Ray 

Carrolyn Ann Reeves 

Wynn Gerald Richards 

Billy J. Ricks 

Helen C. Robertson 

Martha Louise Williamson Rogers 

Nancy Lynn Schefer 

Trudy Lynn Hall Scott 

Deborah G. Hammack Seal 

June M. Seymour 

Ralph Terrell Simmons 

Dan H. Singley, Jr. 

Susan Louise Smith 

Elaine Hedman Steel 

lanell Strangi 

Esther B. Swalm 

Pamela Risner Taylor 

Helen Elizabeth Tampel 

Ronald Reynolds Terry 

Elizabeth H. Thompson 

Michael Bert Thornton 

Andy Thrower 

Sandra Kay Townsend 

Paul Edward Tuccio 

Donald Lee Wade 

Judy Paulette Ward 

Margaret Bennett Watts 

Catherine Lee Wells 

Marilyn Marie Weston 

Jacquelyn Dee White 

Carrol Anne Major Wicker 

Shirley Ruth Henry Williams 

Garnet Wilson, Jr. 

Peter Anthony Viglucci 

Michael S. Withersooon 

Susan Carol Moellers 

Judith Lynn Becking Moore 

Jessie H. Morrison 

Janet Elizabeth Myers 

Janelle Newman 



222 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



John Bishop 
Earl Bowie 
Greg Bozeman 
Andy Campbell 
David Lynn Childs 
Dick Cowart 
William Curtis 
Joseph Devine 
Hugh Fletcher 
Michael Gandy 
Charles Golladay 
Debbie Holdren 
Joe Howell 
Donna Lewis 
Harlan Low 
Ron Manthey 
Bob McDermott 
Mike McPhail 
Lou McPhearson 
Gee Ogletree 
Joe Paul 
Roderick Posey 
Rick Prenshaw 
Wynn Richards 
Jeanne Taylor 
Scott Thames 
John Neil Varnell 
Barry Lee Ward 
Charles Weseman 
Mike Witherspoon 
Vernon Witherspoon 
Dr. John H. Bedenbaugh 
Mr. James C. Bishop 
Dr. Robert A. Brent 
Dr. George Bufkin 
Dr. Johm N. Burrus 
Dr. Joseph Clements 
Dr. William Cliburn 
Col. John F. Dale 
Dr. J.T. Davis 
Dr. Peter Durkee 



Dr. Claude E. Fike 
Dr. David B. Foltz 
Dr. Giovanni Fontecchio 
Dr. John E. Gonzales 
Dr. Albert Gower 
Dr. Billy Joe Grantham 
Dr. Joseph A. Greene 
Dr. Eric Gunn 
Dr. Stanford P. Gwin 
Dr. Graham Hales 
Dr. Gilbert Hartwig 
Dr. William H. Hatcher 
Mr. Sherman Hong 
Dr. Roger B. Johnson, Jr. 
Dr. Wallace G. Kay 
Mr. W.E. Kikrpatrick 
Dr. Walter J. Lok 
Dr. Raymond Mannoni 
Dr. William D. McCain 
Dr. Ken McCarty 
Dr. Neil McMillen 
Dr. Leo Miller 
Dr. Roy N. Moore 
Dr. Charles Moorman 
Mr. Tommy Nance 
Dr. John F. Nau 
Dr. William H. Poirier 
Dr. Dick Prenshaw 
Mr. Tommy Richardson 
Dr. Sam Rosso 
Mr. Gene Saucier 
Dr. John R. Skates, Jr. 
Dr. Peter K. Stocks 
Dr. James Switzer 
Dr. Shelby Thames 
Dr. Forrest D. Tucker 
Dr. J. Fred Walker 
Dr. S.E. Weatherford 
Dr. David L. Wertz 
Dr. Leon A. Wilber 



223 



CWENS 




Members 



Jean Alfonzo 

Bunny Bane 

Patty Bankston 

Barbara Bernzott 

Karen Clinton 

Candace Cook 

Sharon Covington 

Diane Doerres 

Nell Ducomb 

Jane Fortenberry— Secretary 

Ivy Grantham— Treasurer 

Lynn Crier 

Debbie Holdren 

Kathy Hyatt 

Rhonda Kerlin 



Glenda Lambert-President 

Mollie Magee-Vice President 

Dottie McLeod— Ritual Chairman 

Cathy Meeks 

Priscilla Menefee 

Miriam Morris 

Elizabeth Oates 

Jane Perkinson 

Peggy Punesseu 

E'Lane Ried 

Cwen Richardson 

Ginger Schweitzer 

Tina Threadgill 

Sherry Ward 

Cheryl Wileman 



224 



Phi Delta Rho 




Members 



Kathy Ates 
Janet Boyle 
Janet Broadhead 
Kissy Brockman 
Cindy Colquet 
Sherry Clark 
Carol Deer 
Martha DeLoux 
Cindy Landry 
Denise Lewis 
Kathy Maclnnis 



Mary Kate Mathis 
Sherri Mclnnis 
Lise Morreale 
Trudy Moses 
Janet Myers 
Ann Parker 
Gail Hurst Pike 
Janet Poole 
Betty Pritchard 
Mary Etta Purvis 
Jeanne Taylor 



225 



Military Science Department 




Col. Wilfred E. Irish, )r., Chairman 




First row: SFC James H. Henry, SSF Horace G. Richards, Sgt. Maj. Wiley R. Whitworth, Master Sgt. Nerin Clark, Sgt. Maj. Billy C. Greenwood. 
Second row: Capt. Americus M. Gill, Lt Col. Cline G. Cook, Maj. George ). Senter, Col. Wilfred E. Irish, )r., Maj. George ). Moffitt, Maj. 
Sanderson A. Woods. Capt. William H. Roberts. 



226 




ir 



Scabbard and Blade 




First row: Bernard Aikens, Lamar Bethen, jr., Donald R. Cook, Orval Windham, Michael Wood, James C. Mason III. Second row: Robert G. 
Robertson, Raymond, D. King, Roy ). Seaton, Kenneth W. Rigby, Jetfery A. Jenkins, lames M. Anderson, Burkitt D. Collins. Third row: |ohn M. 
Russum, Charles Francis, Sidney K. Smith, Charles W. Cheek, Greg A. Bishop, Stephen S. Slyfield, Donald W. Wells. 



228 



National Society of Pershing Rifles 



run m^ 

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iiiii 






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*&*». 



.IS*^-.^*" *«• ./' 



First row: Victor A. Powers, Gregory P. Cyr, John M. Russum, William T. Meyers, Jr., Donald E. Anderson. Second row: Larry R. Vaughn, |ohn\ 
R. lones, Charles A. Francis, Donald R. Cook. 



229 



Del Sur Company of I'Espirit de Corps 




Beverly Tucker, Pam Moody, Connie Dearing, Ellen Hughes, Cherie Wilmon, Martha Melton, |an Bailey, Karen Ray, Ann Hanson, Laura Irish, 
Donna Freeman. Sponsor: Maj. George Moffitt. 



230 




Col. Wilfred Irish and Maj. George Moffitl pin 
new Cadet Colonel Insignia on Cadet Orval 
Windham, newly promoted Army ROK ( adet 
Corps Commander. 






231 



Department of Aerospace Studies 

The Air Force ROTC Program marked it 
fourth year of operation at USM during the 
74-75 school year. The mission of the AF- 
ROTC Program is to recruit and, through a 
college education program, commission sec- 
ond lieutenants in response to Air Force re- 
quirements. The program is available to men 
and women. Any student in good standing 
with the university may take the general mili- 
tary course as a freshman or sophomore. Se- 
lection into the last two years of the program, 
the Professional Officer Course, is on a com- 
petitive basis. Limited quotas established by 
AFROTC in response to Air Force require- 
ments result in a very elite corps of cadets. A 
major feature of the program is that it is de- 
signed to provide realistic leadership experi- 
ences for all cadets. 

This fourth year also marked the end of an 
era for Lt. Col. David D. Chamberlin, the first 
professor of Aerospace Studies and depart- 
ment chairman. His replacement, Lt. Col. 
Hugh D. McCracken, Jr., is a command pilot 
with extensive bomber experience in the 
Strategic Air Command and Tactical Airlift 
experience in Southeast Asia. He has a Mas- 
ters Degree in education and has spent sev- 
eral years as an instructor seminar advisor. 
He is also a staff member in Professional Mili- 
tary Education at the Air University at Max- 
well Air Force Base in Alabama. He received 
his undergraduate degree from Trinity Col- 
lege in Connecticut and his graduate degree 
from Troy State University in Alabama. 




Lt. Col. Hugh D. McCracken 



Sealed: Lt. Col. Hugh D. 
McCracken, Lt. Col. David D. 
Chamberlin. Standing: Mrs. Le- 
nise Young, SSgt. Ken Miller, 
Capt. William Patton, Maj. 
Thomas Collins III, Capt. Bert 
Lewis, SSgt. Prince Williams, Sgt. 
Bernie Deisler. 




232 




Seated: Cadet Richard Cooper, (add 
ray Curthirds, Cadet Bryan Windam, Ca- 
det Roger Livingston. Standing: Maj. 

Thomas Collins III 




Seated: Cadet Terry McAfee, Cadet 
Charles Frances, Cadet )ay Reed, Cadet 
George Sholl, Cadet Patricia Leja, Cadet 
Don Anderson. Standing: Cadet Corrie 
Hall, Cadet Larry Barrett, Cadet John 
Leja, Cadet Billy Kirkland, Cadet Bill 
Myers. 




Cadet Br\an Windham, Cadet Arthur 
Marble, Cadet Gary Griffin, Cadet Rich- 
ard Cooper, Cadet Ra\ Curthirds. Cadet 
Paul Ramm. 



233 



Arnold Air Society 




First row: Carmen Yoder, Lesley Albers, David Callahan, Arthur Marble, Richard Cooper, Joyn Eastman, Gary Griffin, Paul Ramm, Shannon 
Copponex, Bryan Windham, Ron Manthey, David Edwards. Second row: Edmund Quintana, Jim Venus, George Price, Patrick St. Romain, lay 
Reed, Steve Jordan, Jimmie Reeves, Leonard Jones, Scott Sims, Harold Howell, Greg Burks, Jow Hettinger-Commander. 

Arnold Air Society is a social and service organization sponsored by the Air Force ROTC 
Aerospace Studies Department. The squadron is named in honor of Col. George Robert Hall, a 
Hattiesburg native and former POW held in North Vietman for seven and a half years. 



234 



Angel Flight 




Members: Vickey Bagley, Mary Ann Bruner, Dawn Davis, Amy Day, Diane Doucet, Cindy Griffin, Debbie Holdren, Marsha judge, Sharon 
Kilpatrick, Dahlia Lee, Mary Ellen Lee, Pat Leja, Donna Lewis, Anne Marie Logue, Lynn Roe, Teresa Sandidge, Ginger Schwitzer, Care> Sullivan, 
Wanda Ward, Marianne Watterson, Cindy Wilson. 

Angel Flight is a coed social and service organization sponsored by the George Robert Hall 
Squadron of the Arnold Air Society. In addition to service work, Angel Flight members serve as 

official hostesses at Air Force ROTC functions. 



235 



Panhellenic Council 



Sitting: Diane Bewer, Sara 
Harkins, Anna Sentell-Presi- 
dent, Gwen Bilek, Melinda 
Moore. Standing: Barbara 
Ross-Assistant Dean of Stu- 
dents, Laura Matthes, )amie 
Lenoir, Karlene labour, ]an 
Seymour, Mary Ross Sowell. 




Jr. Panhellenic Council 



Seated: Pat Malley, Irudy 
Wiggins, Holly Odom, leanne 
Timms. Standing: Patty 
Townsend- President, Sandra 
Shaw, Patsy Thrash, Cheryl 
Roberts, Kathie Hamrick, 
Debbie Adams, Lynn Ethridge, 
|udy Stringer. 




236 



Interfraternity Council 



iilii 
fill 




First row: Oliver Shearer, Jerry Hudson, Byron Greco, Randy Mascagni, Bill Morris, )ohn Hutto, Sky Wright. Second row: Marv Allums, 
Steve Nelson, Mark Cumbest, Brock Wilson, Alfred Pace. Third row: William Bourne, Randy Hathorne, Toto Schmersahl, Berengher 
Brechtel— Assistant Dean of Students. 




Officers 



Seated: Randy Mascagni, Sky Wright, )ohn Hutto. Standing: 
Byron Greco, Bill Morris, Berengher Brechtel— Assistant Dean 
of Students. 



237 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 




Members 



Twilah Barnes 
Mae Carol Brown 
Barbara Davis 
Eula Dawson 
Seneatra Lackey 
Contance Mathis 



Vickie McNair 
jeruthia Smith 
Shirley Sutton 
Jewel Tucker 
Adrian Tureaud 
Cassandra Washington 



238 



Omega Psi Phi 




Members 



Joe Brown 
Ron Carter 
Thomas Crossley 
Carl Dailey 
William Dixon 
Rogers Druhet 
Darryl Fluker 
James Fountain 
Joseph Hughey 
Charles Lawrence 
Ronald Lofton 



Michael Marks 
Curtis McLaurin 
Essix Miske! 
Eric Moffet 
Johnny Reynolds 
Paul Smith 
Ron Smith 
Darryl Ulmer 
Lovis Wales 
Reginal Yates 



239 




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277 



Governor of the State of Mississippi 

William L. Waller 




im 



Board of Trustees of State 
Institutions of Higher Learning 




Members 

Milton E. Brister— President 

Dr. E.E. Thrash— Executive Secretary and Director 

Bobby L. Chain, Hattiesburg 

Dr. Robert W. Harrison, Yazoo City 

Travis E. Parker, Drew 

Mrs. Miriam Quinn Simmons, Columbia 

Dr. Verner S. Holmes, McComb 

Boswell Stevens, Macon 

Dr. R.C. Cook, Hattiesburg 

W.M. Shoemaker, Meridian 

M. Paul Haynes, Baldwyn 

Thomas N. Turner, Belzoni 

Mike P. Sturdivant, Clendora 

Ross L. Franks, Hernando 



281 



Dr. William D. McCain 



A Man For All Seasons 



After twenty years of service to USM, Pres- 
ident William D. McCain retired leaving be- 
hind a school he built from a small college 
into a large university. McCain assumed the 
president's position in the Summer of 1955 
and stepped down June 30, 1975. 

McCain's background before coming to 
USM was one of historian and military offi- 
cer. In 1939 McCain created the "Journal of 
Mississippi History," a quarterly publication 
that is still considered an outstanding chron- 
icle of Mississippi history. 

McCain began his military career before 
World War II. Starting out as private, McCain 
became a first lieutenant by the time the war 
broke out. He was sent to Italy after brief 
stays in South America and Africa and was a 
member of military intelligence. He finished 
the war a general searching for Italian dicta- 
tor Benito Mussolini. 



When McCain came to USM, he brought 
with him his training and philosophy, much 
of which he had obtained in the military. A 
lot of building had to be done on Mississippi 
Southern College's campus. To acquire the 
funds for this would take a man with initia- 
tive—a leader. 

One of the first goals McCain strove for 
was university status. He reorganized the 
school from 13 divisions to five schools and 
colleges: the College of Education and Psy- 
chology, the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Home Economics, the School 
of Fine Arts and the School of Business Ad- 
ministration. This new organization paved the 
way for university status and academic 
growth. 

When McCain became president, Missis- 
sippi Southern College consisted of 27 build- 
ings with a student body of 3,000. McCain 



282 







**♦ 








immediately went to work to find a way to 
funnel some of the money that was going to 
the University of Mississippi and Mississippi 
State to his school. 

He sought the help of Dr. M.M. Roberts, a 
Hattiesburg attorney and member of the Mis- 
sissippi Board of Trustees for State In- 
stitutions of Higher Learning. With his help 
McCain got the Board of Trustees to change 
the distribution of state funds so that alloca- 
tion depended on the number of full-time 
students attending each university. This was a 
very significant change since the school then 
started receiving as much money as Missis- 
sippi State and more money than Ole Miss. 

With this formula McCain began his con- 
struction program which started with the R.C. 
Cook Student Union Building in 1956 and is 
ending, his final year, with six projects. In all, 
22 structures were added to or renovated on 
the USM campus. 

Some of the projects were small such as 
the $27,000 Danforth Chapel built in 1957. 
But others were expensive undertakings like 
the $2.25 Million Johnson Science Tower 
completed in 1971. Among the most impres- 
sive construction projects during McCain's 
tenure have been the $1.8 million Pinehaven 
Apartment Complex for married students in 
1961, the Reed Green Coliseum built in 1963 
for $1.4 million, the $1.25 million Education 
Psychology Building and the extensive stu- 
dent housing system on the USM campus. 

During his final year, McCain allocated 
funds for six new projects. A new $2.5 million 
University Union Building is due for com- 
pletion during the Winter Quarter of the 75- 
76 school year; a graduate library, the first of 
its kind in Mississippi, should be completed 
by March of 1976 at a cost of $2 million and a 



new Speech and Hearing Clinic is being con- 
structed at a cost of $2.1 million. The new 
Nursing Building, begun in 1973, opened its 
doors for Summer Quarter use. A Science 
and Technology Building to be built across 
from the Johnson Science Tower will house 
the technology departments. The nine-story 
structure will cost $7.5 million. The renovated 
stadium, a $4.5 million project, is due to be 
dedicated at the 1976 USM-Ole Miss football 
game. The renovation will increase the seat- 
ing capacity from 16,000 to 35,000. As a trib- 
ute to the man who helped make much of 
the construction possible, the new stadium 
will be named the M.M. Roberts Stadium. 

McCain contributed much to USM during 
his twenty years as president. In a Student 
Printz feature article the campus deans 
shared their views on the retiring president's 
greatest contributions to Southern. McCain's 
reorganization of the school, his influence in 
state government and with people in general, 
his open door policy and his daily recording 
of information were all mentioned. But 
McCain's two greatest contributions to USM, 
according to the deans, were his leadership 
and his ability to acquire state funds. 

Dr. Raymond Manoni, dean of Fine Arts, 
pointed out that leadership is the heart of a 
good administration without which the fac- 
ulty is robbed of its potential. 

Dr. Robert van Aller, dean of Graduate 
School, said that McCain had provided "hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars" for his school 
alone. 

The deans also pointed out McCain's 
never-ending support for their school and 
what they did. McCain always gave them en- 
couragement, freedom and responsibility of 
decision-making. Dr. Charles Moorman, 



1M 



dean of the University, said, "He always per- 
mitted me to do what was good for the Uni- 
versity." They also described McCain as "a 
man of his word" with the ability to "make 
decisions now; a man of integrity." 

Powell G. Ogletree, director of Alumni Af- 
fairs remarked, "Dr. McCain was the right 
man at the right time . . . He was always in 
charge of everything— a quality lingering from 
his military career. He is definitely 'the 
man.' " 

Associated Student Body President Gee 
Ogletree pointed out McCain's changing of 
Mississippi Southern College, a school that 
mostly trained high school teachers, into the 
University of Southern Mississippi, a major 
university of the South, as his greatest 
achievement. He added McCain was always 
willing to work with student government on 
any project and was active in "searching out 
opinions, not just taking them when they 
were given to him." 

Hattiesburg Mayor Bud Gerrard com- 
mented, "Having a university in your city is 
better than having an industry, and a well-run 
school is an additional asset. McCain has pro- 
vided that." 

McCain expressed his wishes during the 
Fall Quarter for a quiet, peaceful year. But, as 
he pointed out during his USM Awards Day 
address, it was anything but quiet and 
peaceful. 

Charges of discrimination between both 
Greek and Independents and whites and 
blacks have been made during his final days. 
Petitions, threats of off-campus law enforce- 
ment agency intervention and grand jury ac- 
tion at one of USM's branch campuses have 
troubled the retiring president along with 
suits by the federal government involving al- 



ledged racial discrimination at USM and 
seven other state universities. 

But in the past, McCain has withstood one 
other suit against the University along with 
two grand jury investigations. In every case 
he and his university came through 
unstained. 

It has been a trying final year for the retir- 
ing president. McCain commented that it was 
the type of year that makes a man "want to 
return to the Mississippi Archives" from 
which he came in 1955. 

During the next few years McCain plans to 
continue his extensive work in tracking his 
family's history of descent. He began to 
record the information he was obtaining in 
1965 and has since published four volumes of 
his work entitled "Seven Generations of the 
Family of Alexander Hamilton McCain." 

He became interested in geneology as a 
diversion from the pressures of maintaining a 
growing university during the turbulent years 
of the sixties. McCain does not call it a 
hobby, he considers it a "diversion." 

He plans to publish two more volumes of 
his family's descent plus a new five-volume 
set. He may also write the history of Webster 
County, where he was born. 

Dr. Robert Cecil Cook, vice president of 
the Board of Trustees and former USM presi- 
dent wrote in the special "McCain Edition" of 
the Student Printz, "McCain leaves a great 
tradition at USM, molded somewhat after his 
own life— a scholar, a soldier, an organizer 
and administrator, a nationally-known gen- 
eologist an author of many books in the field 
of history and a good father and grandfather. 
What more could be said than he has, like 
Bishop Thomas More, been 'a man for all 
seasons.' " 



285 



Dr. Aubrey Lucas 



A Perfect Fit 



Dr. Aubrey Lucas, former president of 
Delta State University, was selected by the 
Board of Trustees for State Institutions of 
Higher Learning to assume the presidency of 
USM. Lucas termed the position he will as- 
sume July 1, 1975, as a "fantastic honor." He 
stated he will accept the job "not for the 
money or the prestige, but for the challenge." 

He is not a stranger to the USM campus. 
Lucas is a former professor of educational 
administration, registrar and dean of the USM 
graduate school. He received his B.S. and 
M.A. from USM and his Ph.D from Florida 
State University. 

Lucas served for four years at Delta State 
and said the decision to leave that school was 
a "tough one." He added, "But the decision 
was made to leave and time will tell if the 
committee made the best choice." 

USM faculty, student and alumni were in- 
terviewed by the Board of Trustees to help 
find a man to fill the vacancy caused by Dr. 
William D. McCain's retirement. Suggestions 
that were made included an aggressive open 
man with administrative experience and who 
would allow more student and faculty partici- 
pation in University decision-making. The 
committee also wanted someone who would 
promote unity and pride on campus and who 
would continue to academically improve the 



University before continuing expansion. 

Bobby L. Chain, chairman of the Board of 
Trustees selection committee, said that Lucas 
was "the best man for the job." 

The selection of Lucas as president of USM 
was no surprise to the campus. When 
McCain announced his retirement in the 
spring of 1974 Lucas's name was the first one 
mentioned to replace him. 

Regarding his plans for the University, 
Lucas pointed out that USM is in a fast-grow- 
ing part of the state. "We need to be sensi- 
tive to the needs of the area and more atten- 
tion must be given to research, which will call 
for more money." 

He predicted a "moderate growth" for the 
University during his term as president which 
will not be as dramatic as past growth due to 
a smaller population growth rate. 

In describing his relationship with faculty 
members and students, Lucas pointed out 
that he "likes people and does a lot of listen- 
ing." He said he considers himself a "per- 
ennial freshman" who likes to "get out and 
do things that students enjoy." 

McCain described Lucas as someone dif- 
ferent than himself. He said, "We've gone 
through bitter battles; I fit into battles, he'll fit 
into the peaceful world." 



286 




ROBERT "ACE" CLEVELAND 
Director of Athletic Public Relations 



WILLIAM C. SCRJJGGS 

Director of the Computer Center 



RADER GRANTHAM 

Associate Dean of Student Affairs 







ANNE JORDAN 

Assistant Dean of Student Affairs 






HOMER E. SULLIVAN 
Director of Student Housing 




DR. BILL W. SHAFER 

Director of Student Counseling 



DANNY MONTGOMERY 
Registrar 




DR. WALLACE KAY 

Director of the George Robert Olliphant Hon- 
ors Program 



>&3 

mm 



1 

1 


RICHARD PRENSHAW 1 
Assistant to the Dean of the University 1 




DR. ROBERT VAN ALLER 1 
Dean of Graduate School 1 


■nJ 







RICHARD T. DODDER 

Director of the English Language Institute 



GENE D. SAUCIER 

Dean of Administrative and Academic Services 





PAULINE STOUT 

Editing and Research Assistant to the President 



I 





KENNETH E. SMITH 
Chief Accountant 














WALTER O. CONN 

Director of Student Aid and Scholarships 





BETTY COOLEY 
Cashier 






GOMER POUND 

Dean of the Division of Extension and Public 

Services 



WILLIAM F. TRACEY 
Librarian 




WILLIE V. OUBRE 

Director of Campus Security 



JOEL R. EAKENS 

Director of the Physical Plant 




CECIL M. KLUTTS 
Purchasing Agent 



JESSE GORE 

Manager of the Bookstore 




' 





1 
1 


DR. BOYD KELLETT 1 
Director of Student Health Services 1 




JOHN TAYLOR 1 
Director of Food Services 1 



WILLIAM T. MILLER 

Director of the Post Office and Telephone 

Exchange. 






Dr. Claude E. Fike 

dean, College of 

Liberal Arts 



2% 



Dr. Shelby Thames 

dean, College of 
Science and Technology 





297 




Dr. Eric M. Gunn 

dean, College of 
Education and 
Psychology 







298 






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dean, School of Health, 
Physical Education and 
Recreation 




Dr. Raymond Mannoni 

dean, School of 

Fine Arts 




Dr. Joseph A. Green 

dean, School of 
Business Administration 





301 




Elizabeth Harkins 

dean, School of Nursing 




302 




Dr. Sarah Gibbs 

dean, School of 
Home Economics 






Dr. Lester Glick 

dean, School of 
Social Work 



MH 



3fl 



lotography 
Contest 



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Third place winner, Carole Hutch ins 




Second place winner, Cheryl Goodman 




First place winner, Scott Cramer 



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368 



Harry Dole 




369 



Chip Millet 




Chip Millet 




Harry Dole 



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Harry Dole 



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Buddy Mayo 




374 













Harry Dole 





375 



Harry Dole 




376 



Harry Dole 




377 







Index 






94-99 




230 




96,97 


National Society of 






94,95 




229 


Administration 


98,99 

...288-295 


Scabbard and Blade 


228 




147 




215 




.. , 216 




211 


Mr. and Miss USM 


,144 




238 




199 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


221 




52-63 




214 




, 52-55 




198 




56-59 


Alpha Sigma Alpha 


..240, 241 




60-63 




..242, 243 




50,51 




212 




223 


Art Credits 


379 




239 




.172,173 




236 




203 


Phi Alpha Theta 


219 


Baseball 


...122-125 


Phi Chi Theta 


210 


Basketball 


...118-121 


Phi Delta Rho 


225 


Beauties 


..148, 149 


Phi Eta Sigma 


220 


Beta Chi Chapter- Beta Beta Beta 


212 


Phi Kappa Phi 


222 


Board of Trustees for State 






..258, 259 


Institutions of Higher Learning 


218 




199 


Business Student Advisory Council 


206 


Phi Mu ■. 


..260, 261 


Chi Omega 


...108-109 
..244, 245 




379 


Pi Beta Phi 


..262, 263 


...308-367 




..264, 265 




...308-311 




1% 




...312-329 




175 




...332-367 




175 




217 




76-79 




117 




..266, 267 




92,93 




200 




193 




..268, 269 




...102-105 




..270, 271 


CWENS 


224 




..272, 273 




...296-304 


Society for the Advancement 




Delta Delta Delta 


..246, 247 




209 




..248, 249 




..178, 179 




207 


State Leaders-Looking Ahead 


. ,64-75 


Delta Zeta 


..252, 253 




..106, 107 


Department of Aerospace Studies 


...232-235 


Student Religious Federation 


201 


Angel Flight 


235 




174 




. , 234 




,379 




197 




192 


Football 


...110-115 




198 




145 




..126,127 


Hall of Fame 


...136,137 


The Pride 


..194, 195 


Homecoming Queen 


146 


The Student Printz 


..176,177 


Home Economics Club 


218 


UAC Presents 


...150-154 




237 




...115-116 




...128-133 




..184, 185 




..252, 253 


University Orchestra 


...186-189 




..254, 255 




..182, 183 




219 




...186-189 




218 


USM Collegiate Chapter of the 






..256, 257 


American Marketing Association.... 


208 




204 


USM Jazz Lab Band 


,191 | 


Library Science Student Organization 


217 


USM Speech and Hearing Association 


213 




..286, 287 


USM Theater Productions 


..142, 143 




205 




, ,190 


McCain, William D 


...282-285 




202 




213 


Who's Who Among American 






...226-231 


Colleges and Universities 


...138-141 


Del Sur Company of 




WMSU 


..180, 181 



Photo Credits 



Harry Dole 
13, 14, 20, 21, 23, 25, 28, 29, 32, 33, 38, 42-1, 43-2, 
45-2, 46-3, 47-1, 49, 80-91, 95, 96, 102-1, 104-2, 
104-3, 104-4, 105-1, 105-4, 105-5, 134-3, 134-8, 
134-10, 134-13, 162-2, 162-3, 163-5, 163-6, 163-7, 
164-3, 164-4, 165-5, 165-6, 165-7, 167-3, 168-2, 
168-3, 168-4, 169-2, 170-2, 170-3, 171-1, 274-1, 
274-3, 274-4, 275-3, 276-1, 276-2, 276-3, 277-1, 
277-4, 278-5, 279-6, 279-11, 341-5, 350-2, 360-1, 
361-3, 361-4, 380-2, 380-4, 381-6, 381-7, 381-8, 
382-1, 382-4, 383-5. 



Hugh Fletcher 
44-1, 44-2, 45-3, 134-4, 102-2, 104-1, 162, 163- 
1, 163-2, 165-1, 165-2, 166-2, 166-3, 166-3, 
166-4, 167-1, 168-4, 168-5, 167-4, 167-5, 168- 
3, 168-2, 169-1, 169-2, 279-10, 283-8, 281-7, 
283-6, 340-2, 340-3, 340-4, 382-2, 382-3, 382- 
6, 393-7. 



Tom Knight 
4, 8, 9, 15, 16, 17, 19, 24, 26, 27, 30, 36, 48, 134-6. 



Buddy Mayo 
1, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 22, 31, 40, 41, 42-2, 103-1, 105-2, 
105-3, 134-2, 134-9, 134-14, 171-2, 178-1, 169-5, 
278-1, 278-2, 278-3, 278-4, 279-2, 279-7, 279-8, 
279-10, 383-8. 



Chip Millet 
34, 35, 46-1, 135-11, 134-7, 135-12, 167-2, 167-6, 
167-8, 169-1, 169-3, 169-6, 171-3, 275-2, 274-6, 
341-6, 350-3. 



Jorje Montecoranea 
2, 3, 12, 18, 37, 39, 43-1, 170-1, 168-1, 275-5. 



All other photographs were taken by University 
Photo Service. 



George Pearl 
277-3, 277-4 



Kathy Stanley 
46-2, 47-2. 



John Solomon 
166-1, 168-1, 274-2, 275-1, 279-1, 278-6, 279-5, 
340-1, 350-1, 351-6, 380-3, 381-5. 



Story Credits 



J. Anon-76-77. 

Steve Dantin-106-107. 

Steve Likins-98. 

Buddy Mayo-50-51; 64-75; 110-114; 115-116; 117; 282- 

. 285; 286. 
Danny Nobles-118-121. 
Waid Prather-52-55; 56-59; 92; 94; 100. 
Howard Sit— 97; 102-105; 122-125; 126. 



Art Credits 



Buddy Mayo-101. 

Chip Millet-65, 2%, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 313, 
304. 



Attribute all mistakes to the printing company. God knows, everything was perfect when I sent it in— the Editor. 




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